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Thomas Aquinas - Wikipedia

Thomas Aquinas – Wikipedia

Saint

Thomas Aquinas

O.P.

An altarpiece in Ascoli Piceno, Italy,
by Carlo Crivelli (15th century)

Notable work

  • Summa Theologiae
  • Summa contra Gentiles

Main interests

  • Metaphysics
  • Logic
  • Theology
  • Mind
  • Epistemology
  • Ethics
  • Politics
  • Aristotelian theology
  • Notable ideas

  • Five proofs of God’s existence
  • Analogia entis
  • Thomistic hylomorphism
  • Divine simplicity
  • Peripatetic axiom
  • Principle of double effect
  • Homo unius libri
  • Infused righteousness
  • Theological intellectualism
  • Quiddity
  • Just price
  • Determinatio
  • Actus purus
  • Actus Essendi
  • Thomistic sacramental theology
  • Views of Thomas Aquinas
  • Influences

      • Aristotle
      • Plato
      • Socrates
      • Averroes[5]
      • Augustine of Hippo
      • Boethius
      • St. Paul
      • Pseudo-Dionysius
      • Albertus Magnus
      • Maimonides
      • Avicenna
      • Al-Ghazali[6]
      • Cicero[7]
      • Anselm of Canterbury[8]

      Influenced

      • Virtually all of subsequent Western philosophy and Catholic theology,[9] as well as a significant amount of Protestant theology

      Aquinas, Scotus, and Ockham

    • Cardinal virtues
    • Just price
    • Just war
    • Probabilism
    • Natural law
    • Personalism
    • Social teaching
    • Virtue ethics
    • Augustinianism
    • Cartesianism
    • Molinism
    • Occamism
    • Salamanca
      • Neo-scholasticism
    • Scotism
    • Thomism
    • Ancient

    • Ambrose
    • Athanasius the Great
    • Augustine of Hippo
    • Clement of Alexandria
    • Cyprian of Carthage
    • Cyril of Alexandria
    • Gregory of Nyssa
    • Irenaeus of Lyons
    • Jerome
    • John Chrysostom
    • John of Damascus
    • Justin Martyr
    • Origen
    • Paul the Apostle
    • Tertullian
    • Postclassical

    • Pseudo-Dionysius
    • Boethius
    • Isidore of Seville
    • Scotus Eriugena
    • Bede
    • Anselm of Canterbury
    • Hildegard of Bingen
    • Peter Abelard
    • Symeon the New Theologian
    • Bernard of Clairvaux
    • Hugh of Saint Victor
    • Thomas Aquinas
    • Benedict of Nursia
    • Pope Gregory I
    • Peter Lombard
    • Bonaventure
    • Albertus Magnus
    • Duns Scotus
    • Roger Bacon
    • Giles of Rome
    • James of Viterbo
    • Giambattista Vico
    • Gregory of Rimini
    • William of Ockham
    • Catherine of Siena
    • Paul of Venice
    • Modern

    • Baltasar Gracián
    • Erasmus of Rotterdam
    • Thomas Cajetan
    • Nicholas of Cusa
    • Luis de Molina
    • Teresa of Ávila
    • Thomas More
    • Francis de Sales
    • Francisco de Vitoria
    • Domingo de Soto
    • Martín de Azpilcueta
    • Tomás de Mercado
    • Antoine Arnauld
    • René Descartes
    • Robert Bellarmine
    • Ignacy Krasicki
    • Hugo Kołłątaj
    • François Fénelon
    • Alphonsus Liguori
    • Nicolas Malebranche
    • Blaise Pascal
    • Francisco Suárez
    • Giovanni Botero
    • Felicité de Lamennais
    • Antonio Rosmini
    • John Henry Newman
    • Contemporary

    • Pope Benedict XVI
    • Pope John Paul II
    • G. E. M. Anscombe
    • Hans Urs von Balthasar
    • Maurice Blondel
    • G. K. Chesterton
    • Yves Congar
    • Henri de Lubac
    • John Finnis
    • Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange
    • Étienne Gilson
    • René Girard
    • Nicolás Gómez Dávila
    • Romano Guardini
    • John Haldane
    • Dietrich von Hildebrand
    • Bernard Lonergan
    • Marshall McLuhan
    • Alasdair MacIntyre
    • Gabriel Marcel
    • Jean-Luc Marion
    • Jacques Maritain
    • Emmanuel Mounier
    • Josef Pieper
    • Karl Rahner
    • Edith Stein
    • Charles Taylor
      • v
      • t
      • e
      • Jesus
      • Christ
    • Nativity
    • Crucifixion
    • Resurrection
      • Bible
      • Foundations
    • Old Testament
    • New Testament
    • Gospel
    • Canon
    • Church
    • Creed
    • New Covenant
    • Theology

    • God
    • Father
    • Son
    • Holy Spirit
    • Apologetics
    • Baptism
    • Christology
    • History of theology
    • Mission
    • Salvation
      • History
      • Tradition
    • Apostles
    • Peter
    • Paul
    • Mary
    • Early Christianity
    • Church Fathers
    • Constantine
    • Councils
    • Augustine
    • East–West Schism
    • Crusades
    • Aquinas
    • Reformation
    • Luther
      • Denominations
      • Groups
    • Roman Catholic
    • Adventist
    • Anabaptist
    • Anglican
    • Baptist
    • Calvinist
    • Evangelical
    • Holiness
    • Lutheran
    • Methodist
    • Pentecostal
    • Eastern Catholic
    • Eastern Orthodox
    • Oriental Orthodox
    • Church of the East (Nestorian)
    • Jehovah’s Witness
    • Latter Day Saint
    • Oneness Pentecostal
    • Related topics

    • Art
    • Criticism
    • Ecumenism
    • Music
    • Other religions
    • Prayer
    • Sermon
    • Symbolism
    • Worship
      • v
      • t
      • e

      Triumph of St Thomas Aquinas, “Doctor Communis”, between Plato and Aristotle, Benozzo Gozzoli,1471. Louvre, Paris

      Thomism

    • Scholasticism
    • Apophatic theology
    • Divine simplicity
    • Quinque viae
    • Beatific vision
    • Actus purus
    • Sacraments
    • Correspondence theory
    • Hylomorphism
    • Substance theory (ousia)
    • Substantial form
    • Quiddity (essence / accident
    • nature)
    • Peripatetic axiom
    • Principle of double effect
    • Cardinal / Theological / Intellectual virtues
      • Determinatio
    • Just war
    • Just price
    • Concupiscence
    • Analytical Thomism
    • Works

      • Treatise on Law
    • Summa contra Gentiles
    • Contra Errores Graecorum
    • Commentaries on Aristotle
    • People

    • Aristotle
    • St. Paul
    • Pseudo-Dionysius
    • St. Augustine
    • St. Boethius
    • Avicenna
    • Peter Lombard
    • Averroes
    • Maimonides
    • St. Albertus Magnus
    • Reginald of Piperno
    • Related topics

    • Pange Lingua
    • Aristotelianism
    • Dominican Order
    • School of Salamanca
    • Catholic theology
    • Doctor of the Church
    • Empiricism
    • Neo-Thomism
    • Æterni Patris
    • 046CupolaSPietro.jpg Catholicism portal
    • Socrates.png Philosophy portal
      • v
      • t
      • e

      Virtue denotes a certain perfection of a power. Now a thing’s perfection is considered chiefly in regard to its end. But the end of power is act. Wherefore power is said to be perfect, according as it is determinate to its act.[91]

      Now the object of the theological virtues is God Himself, Who is the last end of all, as surpassing the knowledge of our reason. On the other hand, the object of the intellectual and moral virtues is something comprehensible to human reason. Wherefore the theological virtues are specifically distinct from the moral and intellectual virtues.[95]

      . . . this is the first precept of the law, that good is to be done and promoted, and evil is to be avoided. All other precepts of the natural law are based on this . . .[99]

      Saint Thomas Aquinas by Luis Muñoz Lafuente

      17th-century sculpture of Thomas Aquinas

      Super libros de generatione et corruptione

      Since the generation of one thing is the corruption of another, it was not incompatible with the first formation of things, that from the corruption of the less perfect the more perfect should be generated. Hence animals generated from the corruption of inanimate things, or of plants, may have been generated then.[121]

      Super Physicam Aristotelis, 1595

      The same thing is true of those substances Empedocles said were produced at the beginning of the world, such as the ‘ox-progeny’, i.e., half ox and half-man. For if such things were not able to arrive at some end and final state of nature so that they would be preserved in existence, this was not because nature did not intend this [a final state], but because they were not capable of being preserved. For they were not generated according to nature, but by the corruption of some natural principle, as it now also happens that some monstrous offspring are generated because of the corruption of seed.[122]

    • First, war must occur for a good and just purpose rather than the pursuit of wealth or power.
    • Second, just war must be waged by a properly instituted authority such as the state.
    • Third, peace must be a central motive even in the midst of violence.[124]
    • In self-defense, as long as there is a reasonable possibility of success. If failure is a foregone conclusion, then it is just a wasteful spilling of blood.
    • Preventive war against a tyrant who is about to attack.
    • War to punish a guilty enemy.
    • The response must be commensurate with the evil; more violence than is strictly necessary would be unjust.
    • Governing authorities declare war, but their decision is not sufficient cause to begin a war. If the people oppose a war, then it is illegitimate. The people have a right to depose a government that is waging, or is about to wage, an unjust war.
    • Once war has begun, there remain moral limits to action. For example, one may not attack innocents or kill hostages.
    • The belligerents must exhaust all options for dialogue and negotiation before undertaking a war; war is legitimate only as a last resort.
    • For the original text of the five proofs, see Quinque viae

    • Motion: Some things undoubtedly move, though cannot cause their own motion. Since, as Thomas believed, there can be no infinite chain of causes of motion, there must be a First Mover not moved by anything else, and this is what everyone understands by God.
    • Causation: As in the case of motion, nothing can cause itself, and an infinite chain of causation is impossible, so there must be a First Cause, called God.
    • Existence of necessary and the unnecessary: Our experience includes things certainly existing but apparently unnecessary. Not everything can be unnecessary, for then once there was nothing and there would still be nothing. Therefore, we are compelled to suppose something that exists necessarily, having this necessity only from itself; in fact itself the cause for other things to exist.
    • Gradation: If we can notice a gradation in things in the sense that some things are more hot, good, etc., there must be a superlative that is the truest and noblest thing, and so most fully existing.
    • Ordered tendencies of nature: A direction of actions to an end is noticed in all bodies following natural laws. Anything without awareness tends to a goal under the guidance of one who is aware. [126]
    • God is simple, without composition of parts, such as body and soul, or matter and form.[127]
    • God is perfect, lacking nothing. That is, God is distinguished from other beings on account of God’s complete actuality.[128] Thomas defined God as the ‘Ipse Actus Essendi subsistens,’ subsisting act of being.[129]
    • God is infinite. That is, God is not finite in the ways that created beings are physically, intellectually, and emotionally limited. This infinity is to be distinguished from infinity of size and infinity of number.[130]
    • God is immutable, incapable of change on the levels of God’s essence and character.[131]
    • God is one, without diversification within God’s self. The unity of God is such that God’s essence is the same as God’s existence. In Thomas’s words, “in itself the proposition ‘God exists’ is necessarily true, for in it subject and predicate are the same.”[132]
    • I answer that, The Person or hypostasis of Christ may be viewed in two ways. First as it is in itself, and thus it is altogether simple, even as the Nature of the Word. Secondly, in the aspect of person or hypostasis to which it belongs to subsist in a nature; and thus the Person of Christ subsists in two natures. Hence though there is one subsisting being in Him, yet there are different aspects of subsistence, and hence He is said to be a composite person, insomuch as one being subsists in two.[147]

    • only God can perform miracles, create and transform[152]
    • angels and demons (“spiritual substances”) may do wonderful things, but they are not miracles and merely use natural things as instruments[153]
    • any efficacy of magicians does not come from the power of particular words, or celestial bodies, or special figures, or sympathetic magic, but by bidding (ibid.,105),
    • “demons” are intellective substances who were created good and have chosen to be bad, it is these who are bid.[154]
    • if there is some transformation that could not occur in nature it is either the demon working on human imagination or arranging a fake[155]
    • Aquinas Institute, New York
    • Aquinas School in San Juan City, Philippines
    • Aquinas University in Legazpi City, Philippines
    • International Council of Universities of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Houston
    • Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas, Vatican City
    • St. Thomas Aquinas College, New York
    • St. Thomas Aquinas High School (Florida)
    • Thomas Aquinas College, California
    • University of Santo Tomas, Philippines
    • University of St. Thomas (Minnesota)
    • Aquinas College (Michigan)
    • Aquinas College, Stockport, England
    • Aquinas College (Tennessee), Nashville, Tennessee
    • Davies, Brian (1993). The Thought of Thomas Aquinas. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-826753-3.
    • ——— (2004). Aquinas: An Introduction. Continuum. ISBN 0-8264-7095-5.
    • Hampden, Renn Dickson (1848). The Life of Thomas Aquinas: A Dissertation of the Scholastic Philosophy of the Middle Ages. Encyclopædia Metropolitana. London: John J. Griffin & Co.
    • Healy, Nicholas M. (2003). Thomas Aquinas: Theologian of the Christian Life. Ashgate. ISBN 0-7546-1472-7.
    • Kreeft, Peter (1990). Summa of the Summa. Ignatius Press. ISBN 0-89870-300-X.
    • Küng, Hans (1994). Great Christian Thinkers. New York: Continuum Books. ISBN 0-8264-0848-6.
    • Nichols, Aidan (2002). Discovering Aquinas. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans Publishing Company. pp. 80–82.
    • Russell, Bertrand (1967). A History of Western Philosophy. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-20158-1.
    • Stump, Eleonore (2003). Aquinas. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-02960-0.
    • Torrell, Jean-Pierre (2005). Saint Thomas Aquinas (Rev. ed.). Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press. ISBN 978-0-8132-1423-8. OCLC 456104266.
    • Corpus Thomisticum – his complete works (in Latin)
    • Corpus Thomisticum (A searchable Latin text for Android devices)
    • Documenta Catholica Omnia – his complete works in PDF files, in (in Latin, Italian, English, German, Spanish, French, and Portuguese)
    • Works by Thomas Aquinas at Project Gutenberg
    • Works by or about Thomas Aquinas at Internet Archive
    • Bibliotheca Thomistica IntraText: texts, concordances and frequency lists
    • Aquinas, Thomas (2000). Mary T. Clark (ed.). An Aquinas Reader: Selections from the Writings of Thomas Aquinas. Fordham University Press. ISBN 0-8232-2029-X.
    • The Catechetical Instructions of Saint Thomas Aquinas (PDF). documentacatholicaomnia.eu. Translated by Collins, Rev. Joseph B. Baltimore. 9 February 1939. p. 137. Archived (PDF) from the original on 16 December 2007. (with imprimatur of the Archbishop Michael J. Curley)
    • Catena Aurea (partial) at ccel.org
    • [Compendium theologiae] Aquinas, Thomas (2002). Aquinas’s Shorter Summa. Manchester, New Hampshire: Sophia Institute Press. ISBN 1-928832-43-1.
    • On Being and Essence (De Ente et Essentia)
    • De Magistro (On the teacher q. 11, a.1 of de Veritate)
    • [De principiis naturae] The Principles of Nature
    • [De rationibus fidei] De Rationibus Fidei/Reasons for the Faith against Muslim Objections …
    • [De unitate intellectus] McInerny, Ralph M. (1993). Aquinas Against the Averroists: On There Being Only One Intellect. Purdue University Press. ISBN 1-55753-029-7.
    • Summa contra Gentiles
    • Summa Theologica
    • Summa totius logicae. [s.n.]: [s.l.], 1880. 96 p. Available online at the University Library in Bratislava Digital Library.
    • An Aquinas Bibliography
    • Thomas Aquinas in English
    • Online Galleries, History of Science Collections, University of Oklahoma Libraries—high resolution images of works by Thomas Aquinas in JPEG and TIFF formats
    • “Thomas Aquinas”. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    • Brown, Paterson. “Infinite Causal Regression”, Philosophical Review, 1966.
    • Brown, Paterson. “St. Thomas’s Doctrine of Necessary Being”, Philosophical Review, 1964.
    • “Aquinas the Scholar” from The Thirteenth, the Greatest of Centuries, ch. XVII by James Joseph Walsh
    • “Introductory Guide to Reading the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas”
    • Actus Essendi: An Electronic Journal on Aquinas’s Doctrine of the Act of Being.
    • On the legend of St. Albert’s automaton
    • Aquinas on Intelligent Extra-Terrestrial Life
    • Poetry of St. Thomas Aquinas
    • Biography and ideas at SWIF/University of Bari/Italy (Italian)
    • “Postilla in Job”—A photographic facsimile from the Book and Special Collections Division at the Library of Congress
    • “Aquinas’ Moral, Political and Legal Philosophy”, by J. Finnis (2011), in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    • Thomistic Philosophy—Inspired by the enduring thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas
    • Article on Thomism by the Jacques Maritain Center of Notre Dame University
    • Thomistica.net news and newsletter devoted to the academic study of Aquinas
    • Discussion of Aquinas, In Our Time, BBC Radio 4, 2009
    • St. Thomas Aquinas (PDF) biography from Fr. Alban Butler’s Lives of the Saints
    • St. Thomas Aquinas biography by G. K. Chesterton
    • “St. Thomas Aquinas” article by Daniel Kennedy in the Catholic Encyclopedia (1912), at NewAdvent.org
    • St. Thomas Aquinas biography by Jacques Maritain
    • Vita D. Thomae Aquinatis, a pictorial life of Aquinas from a manuscript by Otto van Veen (1610)
    • Source: en.wikipedia.org

      Author: Authority control


      Work begins on long-delayed Town of Brookfield apartment development. It will have 24 units north of Galleria West.

      Work begins on long-delayed Town of Brookfield apartment development. It will have 24 units north of Galleria West.

      Construction is beginning on a long-delayed Town of Brookfield apartment development.

      Revel Investments, Brayton Devco and Altius Building Co. are developing the 24-unit apartment project at 655 N. Brookfield Road, just north of Galleria West retail center, 18900 W. Blue Mound Road.

      The site development will include renovations to an existing Brookfield Road mixed-use building, which is home to offices, an apartment and Hatched bakery.

      The new three-story, 36,306 square-foot apartment building will be constructed directly behind that building.

      Known as Six55 Brookfield Apartments, it will feature one- and two-bedroom units. 

      The building’s amenities will include private decks, a community room with an on-site workout facility, secure delivery lockers, underground parking and rooftop solar panels.

      Construction has started, and completion is projected by November, the developers announced Thursday.

      Brookfield-based First Federal Bank provided financing for the $6.8 million project.

      The apartments received town Plan Commission approval in 2016.

      “We’re excited for this partnership, for this project, and for the opportunity to add multifamily to our portfolio,” said Steve Pape, managing partner of Revel Investments, in a statement.

      Tom Daykin can be emailed at tdaykin@jrn.com and followed on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. 

      Source: www.jsonline.com


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