Inspiring work

Inspiring work

NEW ORLEANS — Two years out of medical school, respiratory therapist Savannah Stuard is on the front lines of the fight against covid-19 in New Orleans, operating ventilator equipment or manually pumping air into patients’ lungs. The Food and Drug Administration on Sunday issued an emergency use authorization for convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19. No Luka Doncic? No Kristaps Porzingis? Despite some wild line up challenges, the Dallas Mavericks are making it work anyway Faculty and staff members in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work have created an online resource to guide instructors, across disciplines and across different colleges and universities, who are transitioning their classrooms from a traditional seated environment to remote learning.

NEW ORLEANS — Two years out of medical school, respiratory therapist Savannah Stuard is on the front lines of the fight against covid-19 in New Orleans, operating ventilator equipment or manually pumping air into patients’ lungs.

It’s challenging work under any circumstances, involving 12-hour shifts, head-to-toe protective equipment and constant vigilance to avoid catching or spreading the disease. It’s even more complicated for Stuard, who was born without a left forearm.

“I don’t have two hands, only the one,” she said, discussing the challenges of working while maintaining a sterile enviroment. “So I have to sit there and methodically think it out, what to touch next, what to put on my hand to make it as sterile as possible.”

Stuard, who works at Ochsner Medical Center, keeps the tip of her left arm covered with a glove secured by tape.

To prepare for close contact with patients, she practices procedures such as “bagging” — manually pumping air into a patient’s lungs — in a simulation room on a mannequin.

Stuard says she enjoys her work and likes to inspire others along the way.

“It’s so rewarding,” she said. “Most patients see me, and they’re like, ‘Whoa.’ They ask me questions, and I answer them. It’s amazing.”

Stuard volunteers at foundations where she mentors young people with limb differences to show them how she learned to do things like tie her shoes, participate in gymnastics and other sports and learn karate.

She has also shared her experiences with patients she encounters who have lost limbs.

“They’ll say, “I lost my leg in a car accident, and you just give me so much hope,’” Stuard said. “That’s what I love to hear, and that’s what I strive (for) — to help people to be better, because they see someone that has less and doing more, and it makes them feel like they can do more.”

Stuard’s story caught the attention of New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, who has undertaken charitable efforts to help front-line medical workers and provide health care in underserved communities in New Orleans and Baton Rouge.

Brees noted her efforts as part of his work with The Real Heroes Project, a collaboration involving 15 men’s and women’s sports leagues.

Athletes who participate share personal thank-you messages to health care workers on social media.

“He wrote my name on the back of his jersey and said, ‘This is for you, the real hero,’ and he was just thanking me for what I was doing,” Stuard said. “To get recognized like that, it was really great and exciting.”

“They’ll say, ‘I lost my leg in a car accident, and you just give me so much hope.’ That’s what I love to hear, and that’s what I strive (for) — to help people to be better, because they see someone that has less and doing more, and it makes them feel like they can do more.”

— Savannah Stuard, respiratory therapist

Print Headline: Inspiring work

Source: www.nwaonline.com

Author: STACEY PLAISANCE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


FDA issues emergency convalescent plasma treatment for COVID-19

FDA issues emergency convalescent plasma treatment for COVID-19

Aug. 23 (UPI) — The Food and Drug Administration on Sunday issued an emergency use authorization for convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19.

The authorization allows convalescent plasma, which is used in an experimental treatment involving blood plasma transfusions from people who have developed antibodies to the new coronavirus, to be distributed by healthcare providers to treat people with COVID-19. Blood plasma has been used to treat other infectious diseases.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said that more than 70,000 patients have been treated in studies of convalescent plasma for COVID-19 and the treatment has been used in response to MERS and SARS as well as the flue and Ebola.

Azar said there has been a 35% increase in survival through the treatment in patients under 80 who were not on artificial respiration.

FDA administrator Stephen Hahn added that the independent judgment of FDA scientists has determined that COVID-19 convalescent plasma is “safe and shows promising efficacy” and thereby meets the criteria for an emergency use authorization.

He said that the authorization is “not the same as the approval” but allows the FDA to expand access to convalescent plasma.

In July, Trump encouraged virus survivors to visit coronavirus.gov to volunteer to donate their convalescent blood plasma and renewed that call on Sunday.

Sunday’s announcement came after Trump tweeted earlier Saturday that the FDA was “making it very difficult for drug companies to get people in order to test the vaccines and therapeutics.”

Last week, officials at the National Institutes of Health stopped the FDA from issuing what is known as an “emergency use authorization” for blood plasma to treat COVID-19. More data from randomized controlled trials, were needed, officials told The New York Times.

As of Sunday afternoon, COVID-19 has sickened 5.7 million Americans and killed 176,489 as, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University.

The Florida Department of Health reported that the state had confirmed 2,974 new COVID-19 cases, its lowest single-day count since June, and 51 deaths among residents. The state has the second-highest case total in the nation at 600,571 and a resident death toll of 10,325.

Texas reported 4,398 new cases and is in third place with 577,537 total cases and 104 new deaths for a death toll of 11,370.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday announced that COVID-19 hospitalizations dropped to 472, the lowest number in the state, which was once the epicenter for the virus in the United States, since March 16.

Cuomo also announced that the state reported 572 new confirmed cases for a total of 429,737 — fourth most in the nation — and five more deaths, adding to the nation’s highest death toll at 25,288.

Georgia is in fifth place in cases, reporting 1,727 new positives for a total of 253,949 and 40 new deaths for a total of 5,132.

North Carolina reported 1,472 new cases on Sunday for a total of 155,113 and 10 new deaths, bringing its death toll to 2,531.

Eastern Carolina University announced Sunday that all undergraduate students would move to online instruction for the remainder of the fall semester beginning Wednesday, citing “a rapid acceleration of COVID-19 cases, including multiple clusters” following the first two weeks of in-person classes.

Source: www.upi.com


The Dallas Mavericks are making it work despite their star players not seeing the floor together

The Dallas Mavericks are making it work despite their star players not seeing the floor together

You can forgive yourself if you don’t remember every detail. When your team is deep in the trenches of a playoff battle like this one each game, even with a truncated schedule, can feel like separate seasons. Lifetimes apart.

The Dallas Mavericks have apparently saved up every ounce of drama from the recent history of playoff-less basketball and decided to pack it into their first round series with the Los Angeles Clippers.

Each game has featured a new curve ball, and each curve ball has revolved around the core of the Mavericks present and future. Game 1 saw a suspect Kristaps Porzingis ejection, yet they were still in it. Game 2 locked Luka Doncic up in foul trouble, playing nine minutes in the second half, yet they led wire to wire. Game 3 took Luka’s left ankle, yet the Mavericks stayed mostly in arm’s reach. Now Game 4, the most recent episode:

A reminder the Mavericks won this game:
– without KP
– starting a bubble signee
– with Luka on a bum ankle
– coming back from down 21

And they really could be up 3-1. #MFFL

These four games have been a long year.

In the midst of big picture ups and downs in this series it’s easy to forget that the Mavericks, the seventh-seed Mavericks who are currently even with the title contending Los Angeles Clippers, have arrived in this moment with their two stars playing just 55 minutes together. Including Sunday’s overtime there have been 197 minutes of basketball, and Luka Doncic and Kristaps Porzingis have shared the floor for just 28-percent of it.

On the other bench, the star duo of Kawhi Leonard and Paul George have seen the floor for 124 minutes. Never mind the struggles of the Clippers’ second star. The Mavericks are facing a team with a surplus of playoff experience, featuring the reigning Finals MVP, and they’re doing so with a new hand tied behind their back each game.

The Mavericks are a trapeze act, and they are flying without a net. All season we’ve understood the reality that while the Mavericks are a good team with a historic offense, they amount to two young stars with a collection of role players playing above their station. So reason would say that messing with the foundation of the team should bring the whole thing crashing down.

Yet the Mavericks have strengthened. They haven’t blinked in adversity. Accustomed to wild swings in momentum all season, they’ve rarely looked the part of a team with little NBA playoff experience. They’re 2-2 after four. It’s a best of three now.

The truth is every team faces adversity, especially by this point in the season. The Clippers themselves are without starting guard Patrick Beverley, who made an appearance in Game 1 but is battling injury. What’s impressed is the Mavericks’ ability to find solutions to nearly every new obstacle, doing so in the face of logic saying the season should be coming to a close.

Who’s to say where the Mavericks would be in this series if they were getting normal playing time from the Doncic-Porzingis duo. We can look past the fact that in their 55 minutes together they are a -15 (thanks in part to the start to Game 1). In the regular season they played 25 minutes per game together, half of every game. The entire system orbits around the rhythm of these two stars.

Credit to Doncic and Porzingis separately, who have each been leaders in their partner’s absence. But even bigger credit to Rick Carlisle and the play of Trey Burke, Seth Curry, Tim Hardaway Jr. — who are +27 in 27 minutes together, and a combined 29-of-64 from three (45-percent) — among others for finding not just solutions, but a fire and confidence that has them believing they can win this series.

Because they can. And they just might.

Source: www.mavsmoneyball.com

Author: Jordan Brodess


UB School of Social Work creates resource to help instructors transition from classrooms to remote instruction

UB School of Social Work creates resource to help instructors transition from classrooms to remote instruction

Metro Creative Connection

Metro Creative Connection

Tue, Aug 11th 2020 12:05 pm

By the University at Buffalo

Faculty and staff members in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work have created an online resource to guide instructors, across disciplines and across different colleges and universities, who are transitioning their classrooms from a traditional seated environment to remote learning.

The resource proceeds with the understanding for how manners of teaching shifted quickly when the pandemic required moving seated classrooms online. Now, with physical distancing and other health and safety precautions still in place as the new academic year approaches, the innovative guide presents remote instruction as a “unique learning experience,” according to its authors, that when carefully instituted can preserve many of the familiar elements of traditional classroom settings.

The guide is available from the School of Social Work’s website.

Although fully online learning has been growing in popularity for roughly 20 years as an alternative to a place-based environment, that method is not the same as the remote instruction that has been instituted because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The guide highlights the differences among online, remote and seated teaching methods, while addressing how instructors might blend elements specific to each mode.

“Understanding these differentiations allows faculty to better meet the needs of their students,” said Melanie Sage, an assistant professor in UB’s School of Social Work who contributed to creating the guide as part of a team with dean Nancy Smyth, clinical professor Denise Krause, senior assistant dean for enrollment and online programs Kathryn Kendall, as well as Steve Sturman, an instructional support staff specialist.

To casually glance at both remote learning and fully online programs is to see a single method branded in two different ways. But that’s actually not the case. The reality is more nuanced.

“Remote learning lies somewhere between place-based instruction and fully online programs,” Sage says. “The perception of students is different. The learning needs are different. And the overall experience is different.”

The pacing of instruction; whether material is delivered synchronously or on-demand; social presence; preparation, for both students and instructors; and self-management skills vary across all three platforms, and the guide compares and explains these distinctions.

Understanding these contexts is critical. And since most of the literature for remote instruction is focused on fully online programs, this new resource provides guidance about how to prepare a class for a remote model motivated by an emergency situation.

Instructors can offer a more campus-like experience by supporting and encouraging the skills fully online learners bring to their programs.

Providing guidance for this kind of shift is a task well suited to social workers in general and the UB School of Social Work in particular, with its emphasis on a trauma-informed perspective.

The shift to remote instruction represents an unexpected disruption for students and teachers.

“Social workers are used to thinking about who is most at risk when a change occurs, and that’s why we felt an urgency to prepare this resource,” Sage says. It’s a “how-to” instrument that was previously not out there in the world. “We’re confident people will find it useful.”

Source: www.wnypapers.com


Inspiring work


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