First loss leaves Steelers with plenty to work on

First loss leaves Steelers with plenty to work on

The shortcomings masked by timely turnovers and just enough offensive splash during Pittsburgh’s 11-0 start were on full display during a stunning 23-17 upset at the hands of Washington on Monday night. Schools have had to rethink how they conduct physical education classes during this pandemic. Six Atlanta artists came into Emory classrooms this semester, working with faculty to help students translate their learning into creative action and activism in the name of social justice. Learn about the work they created in an online showcase Dec. 15. Date: 2020-10-15 12:50:36🔎 Now hiring PART-TIME work-from-home order specialists! Work-at-home in the science industry communicating order statuses and shipping details to customers via the company’s online platform. This part-time work-at-home job offers 20-30 hours per KEXP is a nonprofit arts organization serving music lovers through in-person, broadcast and online programming. Demolition work for the courthouse expansion started Monday.

PITTSBURGH (AP) — The number in the loss column is at “one.” The number of issues the Pittsburgh Steelers are facing after their first setback of the season is considerably higher.

The shortcomings masked by timely turnovers and just enough offensive splash during Pittsburgh’s 11-0 start were on full display during a stunning 23-17 upset at the hands of Washington on Monday night.

The offensive line, missing center Maurkice Pouncey for a second straight game because of COVID-19 protocols, was pushed around by Washington’s younger, more athletic front. The running game, minus James Conner, who like Pouncey sat out due to COVID-19, generated a whopping 1.67 yards per carry and went 0-fer in three shots from the Washington 1 in the second quarter before being abandoned almost completely.

Facing fourth-and-1 at the Washington 25 with the game tied in the fourth quarter, Pittsburgh eschewed a run and instead had quarterback Ben Roethlisberger send an ill-fated lob down the sideline to rookie running back Anthony McFarland Jr. that fell incomplete.

“I live by a coaching creed ‘If you can’t get a yard, you don’t deserve to win’ and that was the case for us in this game,” coach Mike Tomlin said Tuesday.

It’s been that way lately. Pittsburgh’s 21 yards rushing marked the franchise’s third-lowest total since 1970. While Tomlin has stressed repeatedly the Steelers don’t need to grind it out to win — not with Roethlisberger having a remarkable comeback season after missing most of 2019 with a right elbow injury — the inability to produce any sort of consistent offensive balance has taken its toll.

And while Tomlin is aware of how short-handed his offense is without two of its key cogs, he also doesn’t care.

“That (ticks) me off because we’ve got to be the type of group that endures regardless of who is available,” he said.

Tomlin is optimistic both Pouncey and Conner will be available next Sunday against Buffalo (9-3). Yet they will need more than just having their familiar numbers in the lineup to get things right. There’s a mindset associated with running the ball and in that area, the Steelers have been lacking.

“In terms of quality of play, we haven’t been physical enough,” Tomlin said. 

Fixing it can be tricky. Practicing in full pads is almost non-existent even during a “normal” December, let alone one in the middle of a pandemic. Tomlin pointed out the Steelers spent as much if not more time in pads than most clubs during training camp. 

“We carry our pads every day through the team development process,” he pointed out.

Time to hope muscle memory returns quickly.

WHAT’S WORKING

Technically, it’s more like “Watt’s working.”

Outside linebacker T.J. Watt picked up his NFL-leading 12th sack against Washington despite playing without usual running mate Bud Dupree. The other half of one of the league’s best pass-rushing duos is out for the season after tearing the ACL in his right knee.

Not that it mattered much against Washington. Watt was his typically disruptive self, though he did miss a golden opportunity in the fourth quarter when he tried to “scoop and score” on a Washington fumble rather than just fall on it. Washington’s Logan Thomas recovered instead.

WHAT’S NOT

Pittsburgh is struggling when it tries to get tough in short yardage. Against Washington, it didn’t get any better when it tried to get cute. Facing third-and-goal at the Washington 1 in the second quarter, Roethlisberger tried a play-action pass to Jerald Hawkins. 

Two things here. Actually, three. First, Hawkins only became eligible just hours before kickoff after being activated off the reserve/COVID-19 list. Second, Hawkins is a backup offensive lineman by trade. Third, that’s exactly what he looked like when he stumbled into his route and watched Roethlisberger’s lob sail well out of reach.

STOCK UP

James Washington is continuing to make a compelling case for more playing time. A week after his leaping grab in triple coverage helped Pittsburgh escape against Baltimore, Washington turned a hitch route into a 50-yard touchdown. With several of his teammates (more on that in a minute) struggling to hold onto the ball, Washington’s role could continue to grow.

STOCK DOWN

Tight end Eric Ebron and wide receiver Diontae Johnson both have game-breaking ability. To break the games though, they actually need the ball in their hands. That hasn’t been automatic recently. Both had issues with the drops for a second straight game, mostly because they have developed a habit of turning their eyes downfield before securing the catch instead of seeing the ball all the way into their hands. They’re hardly alone. The Steelers lead the NFL in drops with 34 and Tomlin hinted at changes in terms of playing time if things don’t improve.

INJURIES

Cornerback Steven Nelson will attempt to practice on Wednesday and could be available for Buffalo. The same holds true for kicker Chris Boswell, who sat out with a hip injury. The nature of inside linebacker Robert Spillane’s injury is uncertain, but his potential absence opens the door for Avery Williamson, acquired in a trade with the New York Jets earlier this season.

KEY NUMBER

69. The Steelers tied Tampa Bay’s NFL record for consecutive games with at least one sack when Watt took down Alex Smith in the first quarter. Still, Dupree’s absence was felt late as Pittsburgh’s pressure lagged, allowing Smith to make big plays down the field during Washington’s rally.

NEXT STEPS

Try to clinch a playoff berth for the first time since 2017 next week against Buffalo, where the injury-riddled secondary will have to be considerably sharper than it was in the second half against Washington.

Source: www.timesonline.com


PE teachers work to keep students moving - online

PE teachers work to keep students moving – online

Schools have had to rethink how they conduct physical education classes during this pandemic.

That’s been especially true at Fairfield schools, which have been completely virtual since mid-November. But the physical education teachers in the district aren’t letting that stop them from ensuring the student body keeps moving their bodies.

Brian Dunlap teaches PE to the two elementary schools, Washington Elementary covering grades preschool to first, and Pence Elementary covering second through fourth grades. Dunlap meets with his second-, third- and fourth-grade students once a week over Zoom. He posts lessons on a program called Seesaw that the students can do anytime during the week.

Dunlap said it’s certainly a challenge to conduct PE classes remotely. But he said every year brings a new challenge, and this is just the latest.

“I feel like I’m learning new things, and it’s making me a better educator,” he said. “This is new ground for a veteran teacher like me to be walking on.”

Physical education classes normally involve a large number of kids together in the gymnasium or outdoors. Now Dunlap has had to adjust his thinking to accommodate small groups in a small space, especially now that the weather is getting colder and the activities will be limited to the indoors.

“We’re doing a lot of exercise and fitness activities and a lot of dance stuff,” Dunlap said. “Ball skills are hard to incorporate at home because of equipment needs. I’m trying to keep them moving, and I hope they’re enjoying what’s being delivered.”

Dunlap said he’s trying to spend about as much time with the students as he would in a normal year. The second- through fourth-graders do a 20-minute class with him, so it is a little shorter than they would do in person. But the lessons the kids work through should occupy them for 20-30 minutes.

“The kids get 50 minutes a week, and I’m trying to deliver close to that through the computer, but it’s certainly not the same,” Dunlap said.

Attendance is mandatory on the Zoom classes, and Dunlap documents the participation of each student. It’s still tough for Dunlap to monitor his students’ progress. In fact, it’s hard for him to know what the kids are doing apart from their Zoom lessons. He said he relies on parents to help ensure that their children are doing their assigned lessons like they’re supposed to.

“Assessing the kids is pretty hard,” Dunlap said. “I’d rather have my kids in front of me. All of us teachers would. Hopefully, the kids are growing, but this is not as effective as having them in the gym.”

The Union

Source: www.southeastiowaunion.com

Author: Andy Hallman


Online showcase to share work from inaugural Arts and Social Justice Fellows program

Online showcase to share work from inaugural Arts and Social Justice Fellows program

Six Atlanta artists came into Emory classrooms this semester, working with faculty to help students translate their learning into creative action and activism in the name of social justice. Learn about the work they created in an online showcase Dec. 15.

Members of the Emory community are invited to join a project showcase and conversation with the inaugural cohort of the Emory’s Arts and Social Justice Fellows program on Tuesday, Dec. 15, at 12 p.m. The online event, presented by the Emory College Center for Creativity and Arts  (CCA) and Emory University Center for Ethics, is free and open to the public. Registration is required.

Created at a moment of national crisis and inspired by the power of art to open spaces for conversation, community-making and collective action, the Arts and Social Justice Fellows program brought six Atlanta artists into Emory classrooms.

As co-instructors with Emory faculty members this semester, the Arts and Social Justice Fellows were tasked with helping students translate their learning into creative action and activism in the name of racial justice.

“It is powerful to see the way students have been able to participate in this national dialogue,” says Carlton Mackey, director of the Ethics and the Arts program at the Emory Center for Ethics. “This fellows program hopes to give birth to a new generation of activists — a new generation with multiple forms of resistance that can allow students, scholars and community to connect in our different ways of being so we can collectively work toward a world that is a better place for us to live and to thrive.”

“We’re excited to open these conversations to the broader Emory and Atlanta communities, to talk together about how we as well as artists — and this includes every student engaged through this program — can work together to make our world a more just, caring and ethical place,” says Kevin Karnes, associate dean for the arts.

At the Dec. 15 event, each artist and faculty pairing will present a short video showcasing the music, poetry, documentary filmmaking, visual art and monologues their students created this semester. A brief conversation will follow, with participants answering questions from the community. Emory President Gregory L. Fenves will provide opening remarks.

“Through the exhibits, installations and films that are created through this program, we hope to provide opportunities for the dialogue to continue beyond a singular moment,” says Mackey.

The courses and faculty/artist pairings are:

  • Social Justice: Zoning, Contracts and Environmental Racism
    Allison Burdette, professor of practice, business law, Goizueta Business School, with Olivia Dawson, actor and playwright
  • Epigenetics and the Human Condition
    Arri Eisen, professor of pedagogy, biology and the Institute for the Liberal Arts, Emory College, with Fahamu Pecou, visual artist
  • Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases
    Hank Klibanoff, professor of practice, Creative Writing Program, Emory College, with Garrett Turner, actor and playwright
  • Film, Media and the Art of Social Change
    Carlton Mackey, director, Ethics and the Arts Program, Emory Center for Ethics, and Edward Queen, director, Ethics and Servant Leadership Program, Emory Center for Ethics, with Ash Nash, arts advocate and administrator
  • The Feminist Art(s) of Activism
    Alix Olson, assistant professor of women’s, gender and sexuality studies, Oxford College, with Shanequa Gay, visual artist
  • Prevention of Mental and Behavioral Disorders
    Elizabeth Walker, research assistant professor of behavioral, social and health education sciences, Rollins School of Public Health, with Okorie “OkCello” Johnson, composer and cellist
  • Source: news.emory.edu


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    KEXP 90.3 FM - Where the Music Matters

    KEXP 90.3 FM – Where the Music Matters

    Through the stay-at-home orders, we’re dedicated to bringing you new live performances. We’re sharing live streaming performance through our new series, Live on KEXP at Home — both through our YouTube channel and broadcasting on the air on KEXP.

    Hosted by trusted KEXP DJs, musical guests perform sets live, either solo or with their quarantined partners.

    Made possible with support from BECU and Amazon Music 

    More Upcoming On-Air Sessions Here

    See More Archived Sessions Here

    From the front yard of DJ John Richards, host of KEXP’s John In The Morning, aka The Morning Show, Lawn In The Morning is a unique out-studio session/series designed to encourage social distance while still bringing you one-of-a-kind live performances from the finest artists in the Pacific Northwest.

    KEXP announces several upcoming programming changes that will bring a wider range of DJ voices, experiences, and expertise to its radio programming. These changes will serve as an initial public step in advancing KEXP’s commitment to becoming an anti-racist organization, and are aimed at making the station’s music programming stronger overall.

    Programming changes go into effect beginning at 12 AM (Pacific) on July 27th. See the new schedule below or view a text-only version here. Learn more about our new shows and other leadership changes here.

    Source: kexp.org


    Demo work for Benton County courthouse expansion starts

    Demo work for Benton County courthouse expansion starts

    BENTONVILLE — Demolition work for the courthouse expansion started Monday.

    DT Specialized Services of Tulsa, Okla. will do the work for $72,772, County Judge Barry Moehring said. The one-story section behind the courthouse will be demolished. A two-story addition is planned on the site.

    A new courtroom is needed for Christine Horwart, who was elected in March and will be the county’s seventh circuit court judge. She takes office Jan. 1. The Arkansas Legislature added the judgeship to assist with the increasing caseload.

    Horwart’s courtroom and office area will be on the second floor of the addition. A lobby will be on the first floor. The expansion will add 5,500 square feet to the downtown courthouse, which is 28,080 square feet.

    [Don’t see the video above? Click here to watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0SSHgdgELM]

    Demolition will be finished by the end of the year and construction will begin in January, Moehring said.

    The county will finance $3.1 million for the expansion. It secured the loan from Regions Bank for five years at 1.59% with no prepayment penalty, said Brenda Guenther, county comptroller. The Quorum Court approved the plan in July.

    “This is a long time coming to expand our court facilities in downtown Bentonville,” Moehring said.” I’m glad we are able to do this. We are able to do it without raising taxes and with a modest amount of borrowing.”

    Moehring described it as a modest expansion. “It will take care of our courtroom needs for a good five or 10 years,” he said.

    Bryan Beeson, county facilities administrator, said the 5,000-square-foot building once housed the juvenile detention center and later was sectioned off and used by other county offices including the coroner. “It was time for it to go,” he said.

    The plan for the expansion was unanimously approved by Bentonville’s Planning Commission in October.

    The development when finished will include 72 parking spaces and will provide a 12-foot sidewalk along East Central Avenue and an 8-foot sidewalk along Northeast Second Street, according to city planning documents.

    Until the work is completed, Horwart’s courtroom and chamber will be in a small area in the courthouse last used as a courtroom in 2012. The 888-square-foot courtroom has been remodeled. The county budgeted $23,796 for the remodel.

    Included in the court expansion is $231,783 to repair the annex where Circuit Judge Brad Karren holds court, according to documents. The annex is across the street from the main courthouse.

    The courthouse expansion should wrap up by the end of 2021, Moehring said.

    Tracy Neal contributed to this report. Mike Jones may be reached by email at mjones@nwadg.com.

    Source: www.arkansasonline.com

    Author: Mike Jones,Tracy Neal


    First loss leaves Steelers with plenty to work on


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