Experts: Social distancing means work teams go virtual; 5 keys to success

Experts: Social distancing means work teams go virtual; 5 keys to success

As more states mandate that nonessential employees stay home to slow the spread of COVID-19, many leaders and teams are navigating the complexities of remote work for the first time. After pivoting from their traditional gala format, Women in Film and 53 celebrity supporters made it work to air the organization’s first-ever virtual special Wednesday night on the CW. Eva Longoria, Alfre Woodard, Jane Fonda and Rita Moreno were among the stars who participated in the one-hour televised Eugene artist Mike Van doesn’t want to call his new exhibition at White Lotus a “retrospective,” even though the title of the show refers to “A Life’s Work.” He’s still working, he says, and he poi… The UltraMIST® system delivers low frequency ultrasound to the treatment site using a non-contact fluid (e.g., saline). It produces a low energy ultrasound-generated mist used to promote wound healing.

Wed, Apr 1st 2020 07:00 am

By the University at Buffalo

As more states mandate that nonessential employees stay home to slow the spread of COVID-19, many leaders and teams are navigating the complexities of remote work for the first time.

Leadership experts from the University at Buffalo School of Management say the key to successfully managing this transition is maintaining open communication, setting clear and consistent goals, and giving your team a little grace.

Faculty members Kate Bezrukova and Timothy Maynes offer the tips below for leading remote teams effectively — during the COVID-19 crisis and beyond.

•Communicate clearly. Nonverbal communication is critical to team chemistry, according to Bezrukova, Ph.D., associate professor of organization and human resources in the UB School of Management, who studies teams in business and sports.

“When teams go remote, messages can get easily misunderstood and empathy is hard to maintain – these are things leaders need to manage,” she says. “Leaders should be as clear as possible when they communicate tasks, goals and deadlines. Funny and warm messages are effective to raise team spirit, as well.”

•Maintain trust. Without in-person interaction, building trust among team members can be difficult.

“On virtual teams, research shows that performance becomes more important for trust than interpersonal interactions,” says Maynes, Ph.D., associate professor of organization and human resources in the UB School of Management. “Virtual team leaders should reinforce timeliness and consistency of performance, develop mutual expectations for rapid responses, and establish norms for when team members are expected to be ‘online’ to avoid work-related burnout.”

•Organize and prioritize. For remote leaders, organization is paramount to ensure team members understand their assignments and expectations, Bezrukova says.

“Prioritize projects and help others align their priorities by having a vision that goes beyond just one day,” Bezrukova says. “Any randomness in your decisions will make people wonder if you are competent in your job. Having a plan will help to overcome this.”

•Check in regularly. One solution to track goals and progress, Maynes says, is to host daily video conferences.

“One strength of remote teams is that virtual meetings are up to 55% shorter than face-to-face meetings because they tend to be more task-focused, which facilitates problem-solving,” Maynes says.

Another silver lining of working from home is that remote teams tend to develop more creative and innovative ideas than traditional office teams, according to Maynes.

“To reap that particular benefit,” he says, “virtual teams should brainstorm ideas through a written medium, such as email, to minimize the influence of interpersonal processes that cause people to conform to the expectations of others.”

•Show compassion. In this unprecedented and stressful situation, employees are dealing with far more than work-related pressures. Whenever possible, be understanding with your team’s “new normal,” Bezrukova advises.

“People may have kids at home and are managing a lot, so communicate that you understand their challenges,” Bezrukova says. “Bring some light and positivity by sharing funny stories or YouTube clips. Just show your team that you care about them.”

The UB School of Management is recognized for its emphasis on real-world learning, community and economic impact, and the global perspective of its faculty, students and alumni. The school also has been ranked by Bloomberg Businessweek, Forbes and U.S. News & World Report for the quality of its programs and the return on investment it provides its graduates. For more information about the UB School of Management, visit mgt.buffalo.edu.

Source: www.wnypapers.com


Hillary Clinton, Alfre Woodard and Eva Longoria Celebrate Women at Work for Women in Film’s CW Special

Hillary Clinton, Alfre Woodard and Eva Longoria Celebrate Women at Work for Women in Film’s CW Special

After pivoting from their traditional gala format, Women in Film and 53 celebrity supporters made it work to air the organization’s first-ever virtual special Wednesday night on the CW. Eva Longoria, Alfre Woodard, Jane Fonda and Rita Moreno were among the stars who participated in the one-hour televised event, which championed women in all industries, not just Hollywood.

The variety show, titled “Make It Work” featured celebrities at home, finding creative ways to comment on the coronavirus pandemic, the Black Lives Matter movement and the upcoming 2020 election.

Ahead of the broadcast Women in Film president Amy Baer explained how the organization found a way to make the show both fun and informative.

“The one thing we promised the CW that we wouldn’t do, is deliver a vitamin,” Baer told Variety. “Because I don’t think anybody wants to be lectured to about anything. Everybody’s doing the best they can to navigate the world we’re in right now.”

So that meant Women in Film board member Lake Bell opened the show from her shower, fending off calls for “Mom” while sharing the event’s message to #HireHerBack, the organization’s hiring initiative working to ensure that women have equal space in the work force as industries (including Hollywood) resume production.

“The first people to get let off in this crazy time are women. And so, this is really an opportunity to just like press a reset button,” Bell explained. “When we all come back which is soon, why not hire her back, instead of being like, ‘I know a guy,’ know a girl.”

Many stars paired up for their comedy bits. Kym Whitley and Sherri Shepherd hosted a “Drunk Video Chat” throughout the show, with the women drinking every time they remembered something crazy that happened in 2020 — like Netflix’s “Tiger King,” Meghan Markle and Prince Harry leaving the royal family and homeschooling their kids.

Kathryn Hahn and Andrea Savage hosted a “Stich n B—h” session, where they encouraged audiences to get involved politically. Cheryl Hines and Rachael Harris practiced virtual yoga while discussing pay inequality for women. “Dynasty” star Elizabeth Gillies and “Charmed’s” Sarah Jeffrey showed how to make P.P.E. stylish, rocking hand sanitizer holsters for their video, while Beanie Feldstein put all of our fears about leaving our pets at home when we go back to work into perspective. The special also incorporated actor Aimee La Joie’s viral TikTok video, a one-woman depiction of a “film crew,” into the program.

But the centerpiece of the evening was Women in Film’s “For Your Consideration” campaign. Hillary Rodham Clinton introduced the project, saying, “If you want something done. Ask a busy woman to do it. It’s a principle we’ve all seen in action, and it has never been truer than it is right now. … Women’s work powers families, communities, and entire countries.”

The initiative, which has already launched online, highlights the inequality between men and women both in hiring and payment. The creative campaign also features movie posters featuring women writers, directors, composers, producers, and actors with quotes of support from notables in entertainment like Quincy Jones, Diane Warren, Spike Lee, Sia, Ang Lee, Issa Rae and Sir Patrick Stewart.

During the broadcast, Jennifer Garner presented her longtime costumer Maria Bradley (the pair have worked together since “Alias” in 2001) “for consideration” as part of the campaign, while Cobie Smulders shouted out her “Stumptown” and “Spider-Man: Far From Home” stunt double Marie Fink. Isla Fisher praised the “most brilliant hilarious comedy writer” Erica Rivinoja and Beanie Feldstein celebrated make-up artist April Townes. Margaret Cho highlighted Lorene Machado, who has directed four of Cho’s comedy specials, while Melanie Liburd saluted PA Tamika McConnaughey.

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Source: www.yahoo.com

Author: Angelique Jackson


A Life’s Work

A Life’s Work

Eugene artist Mike Van doesn’t want to call his new exhibition at White Lotus a “retrospective,” even though the title of the show refers to “A Life’s Work.”

He’s still working, he says, and he points out there are some recent pieces in the exhibit. He’s also not one to give off airs. He says some people have called his drawings “surreal,” but he just draws what’s around: trees, birds, water. 

The Innovative Eye: A Life’s Work by Mike Van is at White Lotus Gallery through Oct. 3.

“As for how people can visit the show, we’re kind of in a gray area,” gallery manager Jen Huang says. The front door has been open since July, but the gallery still keeps a “by appointment” sign on it to help monitor social distancing. 

In place of the traditional art opening, the artist and his daughter Kim Still, who curated his work for the show, are to create a talk and gallery tour that will be available for viewing online.

How did they select the art for this show? After all, Van’s been making art for a long time. He says he held up a work and his daughter, who studied art history and was the Saturday Market manager for years, told him, “That goes, this doesn’t.”

Talking to Van you get the idea the use of the word “innovative”’ in the show’s title relates to his habit of working off the top of his head. A pencil drawing from 2011 selected for the show titled “Tiara” illustrates this tendency perfectly: The drawing is of a woman who has a tree growing out the top of her head with birds on the branches.

His ocean watercolors done in the studio, mostly without source material, are strong. “Beach Geometry” is a 6-by-10-inch watercolor that flows but also depicts the hard lines and contrast of dark shadows you see on the sand in full sunlight.

He always sketches when he goes to the ocean. Drawing driftwood, rocks and sand, he also likes the wide open beach as a place in which to place figures. In the black and white  “Beach Drift with Figures,” done in sumi ink and watercolor, large pieces of wood come up out of the ocean, dwarfing the figures in their boats. 

Van has been spending time at the Oregon coast since he was first married to his wife, Maron, when they rented a house north of Newport that had a path to the water. His first show, in 1960, was at the Yaquina Art Center in Newport. In Eugene he has exhibited at Maude Kerns Art Center for five decades. And he’s been showing art in group shows at White Lotus Gallery since 2006. 

He says when he got his B.A. degree from the University of Idaho in 1953 there were basically two things a person could do after graduating with an art degree: teach or become a graphic artist. Van’s  degree was in education and art. He then came west and earned his MFA in drawing and painting from the University of Oregon in 1957. For the first four years of his professional life he taught K-12 and then he worked roughly 30 years as a high school art teacher at South Eugene High School. 

I asked if he had to choose — which he totally doesn’t — would he identify himself as an artist or a teacher? He said probably as an artist first, but the two have overlapped. And though he hasn’t taught in a long while — he retired from teaching in 1988 — he continues to paint.

Getting up in the morning, he thinks, “What am I going to do today?” Probably going to pick up a pencil, he says, even though sometimes he should be doing yard work.

The Innovative Eye: A Life’s Work by Mike Van is at White Lotus Gallery, 767 Willamette St., through Oct. 3. Viewing is by appointment; call or email 541-345-3276 or Lin@wlotus.com.

Source: www.eugeneweekly.com


UltraMIST®

UltraMIST®

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The UltraMIST® system delivers low frequency ultrasound to the treatment site using a non-contact fluid (e.g., saline). It produces a low energy ultrasound-generated mist used to promote wound healing.

UltraMIST® produces a low energy ultrasound-generated mist used to promote wound healing through wound cleansing and maintenance debridement by the removal of fibrin, yellow slough, tissue exudates and bacteria.

Do not use near electronic implants/prosthesis (e.g., near or over the heart or over the thoracic area if the patient is using a cardiac pacemaker); on the lower back during pregnancy or over the pregnant uterus; over areas of malignancies.

UltraMIST® generator, treatment wand, and single use applicator. Applicators are sold in 12-count packs.

Removal & Change Frequency

Frequency of patient treatment is to be determined by the treating physician after appropriate patient evaluation. Good clinical practice dictates re-evaluation of the wound at routine intervals by a qualified health care professional. If no improvement is noted, the use of this therapy should be reconsidered.

Source: www.woundsource.com


Experts: Social distancing means work teams go virtual; 5 keys to success


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