Embracing Work-Life Balance at the Dining Room Table

Embracing Work-Life Balance at the Dining Room Table

The fashion designer Thakoon Panichgul and the creative director Russell Spina learn to make work and personal life happen in their two-bedroom Manhattan loft. ‘It’s just hard seeing them get ahead while we feel like we’re stagnant.’ A label dedicated to outfitting tall shoppers for 44 years. Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts alum: PAFA is happy to take the tuition money of its BIPOC students, but turns its back on real, lasting infrastructural change that could support a safe and anti-racist environment within the school. Many do not know … that AVLF provides significant support beyond legal assistance including directing those affected by the COVID-19 pandemic to programs offering free food discounted mental health services and employment opportunities.

Home Together

The fashion designer Thakoon Panichgul and the creative director Russell Spina learn to make work and personal life happen in their two-bedroom Manhattan loft.

  • June 24, 2020, 11:39 a.m. ET

The key to staying sane while sheltering in place for the fashion designer Thakoon Panichgul and the creative director Russell Spina is connection. The couple, who have been together for 20 years, have spent the last three months quarantined in their two-bedroom loft in Manhattan’s TriBeCa neighborhood. This has allowed them to continue to support their favorite local businesses like Chamber Street Wines and the neighborhood pizza joint, Tre Sorelle on Reade Street.

“There is a deep sense of community and love for the city when you go through tough times like this together,” said Mr. Panichgul, 45, noting that they also stayed in New York during 9/11 and Hurricane Sandy. “It never occurred to us to get out of the city.”

But adjusting to quarantine life has had its challenges, like trying to make work and personal life all happen in a confined space.

The couple has settled into a comfortable rhythm at home. They typically wake up around 7 a.m. for a cup of coffee and to walk their 12-year-old Chihuahua-Yorkie mix, Stevie. Then they get to business. Before the coronavirus outbreak, they would each head to their offices, but for the first time, they are working from home at the same time.

Mr. Spina, 54, takes the desk in the second bedroom and spends most of the day on Zoom calls for his work as a senior vice president and creative director at ViacomCBS. For Mr. Panichgul, that leaves the dining room table, which he quickly covers with mood boards, fabric swatches and sketches for his clothing line, Thakoon, and his editorial work with HommeGirls, a magazine and style platform. By 5 p.m., it’s time to pack it up.

“We put work things away — everything,” Mr. Panichgul said. “It’s important, otherwise, you don’t have separation of work and home lives, or even distinguish days.”

Part of that boundary includes an early evening workout together. It’s a new routine for the couple, who previously worked out on their own. Mr. Spina says it feels silly at times, “two men jumping around their living room” with the Nike Training Club app workouts, but it also turned into a creative pursuit. Since the pair couldn’t find dumbbells online, they filled their art and fashion books in tote bags for makeshift weights to walk up and down their building’s stairs.

In a quintessential apartment-living vignette, each gym time involves moving furniture, namely, the dining chairs.

The couple is thankful for the amount of space they have, but do admit that their current situation has been a “mental marathon.” They have learned a lot, though, about making all aspects of life function efficiently in an apartment and with each other. Here are their tips for quarantining in the city.

Mr. Panichgul and Mr. Spina are big on designating space for specific tasks at different parts of the day. They like to work in separate rooms to give each other privacy for calls as well as ample space for creative projects. During the workday, Mr. Panichgul uses the dining room table for fashion design, but come evening, he makes sure it’s “neat and tidy” for evening activities like dinner and a movie. That includes visual changes. Mr. Spina likes to dim the lights, put on music and light candles to create an evening mood that feels calm and relaxing. They break out a happy-hour drink, usually a glass of wine. It all feels like they met at a bar after work to discuss the day.

Updated June 24, 2020

Scientists around the country have tried to identify everyday materials that do a good job of filtering microscopic particles. In recent tests, HEPA furnace filters scored high, as did vacuum cleaner bags, fabric similar to flannel pajamas and those of 600-count pillowcases. Other materials tested included layered coffee filters and scarves and bandannas. These scored lower, but still captured a small percentage of particles.

A commentary published this month on the website of the British Journal of Sports Medicine points out that covering your face during exercise “comes with issues of potential breathing restriction and discomfort” and requires “balancing benefits versus possible adverse events.” Masks do alter exercise, says Cedric X. Bryant, the president and chief science officer of the American Council on Exercise, a nonprofit organization that funds exercise research and certifies fitness professionals. “In my personal experience,” he says, “heart rates are higher at the same relative intensity when you wear a mask.” Some people also could experience lightheadedness during familiar workouts while masked, says Len Kravitz, a professor of exercise science at the University of New Mexico.

The steroid, dexamethasone, is the first treatment shown to reduce mortality in severely ill patients, according to scientists in Britain. The drug appears to reduce inflammation caused by the immune system, protecting the tissues. In the study, dexamethasone reduced deaths of patients on ventilators by one-third, and deaths of patients on oxygen by one-fifth.

The coronavirus emergency relief package gives many American workers paid leave if they need to take time off because of the virus. It gives qualified workers two weeks of paid sick leave if they are ill, quarantined or seeking diagnosis or preventive care for coronavirus, or if they are caring for sick family members. It gives 12 weeks of paid leave to people caring for children whose schools are closed or whose child care provider is unavailable because of the coronavirus. It is the first time the United States has had widespread federally mandated paid leave, and includes people who don’t typically get such benefits, like part-time and gig economy workers. But the measure excludes at least half of private-sector workers, including those at the country’s largest employers, and gives small employers significant leeway to deny leave.

So far, the evidence seems to show it does. A widely cited paper published in April suggests that people are most infectious about two days before the onset of coronavirus symptoms and estimated that 44 percent of new infections were a result of transmission from people who were not yet showing symptoms. Recently, a top expert at the World Health Organization stated that transmission of the coronavirus by people who did not have symptoms was “very rare,” but she later walked back that statement.

Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

A study by European scientists is the first to document a strong statistical link between genetic variations and Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Having Type A blood was linked to a 50 percent increase in the likelihood that a patient would need to get oxygen or to go on a ventilator, according to the new study.

The unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent in May, the Labor Department said on June 5, an unexpected improvement in the nation’s job market as hiring rebounded faster than economists expected. Economists had forecast the unemployment rate to increase to as much as 20 percent, after it hit 14.7 percent in April, which was the highest since the government began keeping official statistics after World War II. But the unemployment rate dipped instead, with employers adding 2.5 million jobs, after more than 20 million jobs were lost in April.

Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

Mr. Spina had been taking French classes at Coucou in SoHo for a year and a half, and while quarantined, he has transitioned to taking classes online. Mr. Panichgul gives him space to continue these classes in the evenings via Zoom, but also supports his lessons by screening French films with him. It’s a new experience watching one particular genre of cinema, Mr. Panichgul said, but he loves the look of French new-wave films, so it felt natural. That extends to new hobbies, too. They have been experimenting with natural wines from various regions of the world, including the sparkling wine pétillant naturel (commonly referred to as pét-nat) and unfiltered white wines..

Both Mr. Panichgul and Mr. Spina admit that their energy levels and moods have been down at times during quarantine. Luckily, they have found that they can be the ultimate motivators for one another. It’s something they took for granted before, when they were busy traveling, working, and rushing around in life. It’s been a blessing, Mr. Spina said, to realize they have the type of relationship where they can lift each other up. It’s as simple, he said, as saying “let’s do this” when one person can’t get started on the day or offering advice for frustrating situations. “You think it’s not going to help but it does,” Mr. Spina added.

Supporting the small business and creative outlets in their community like Amish Market, Chambers Street Wines to Coucou French Classes has helped improve their moods and keep each other’s mental health in check. They both feel a strong sense of loyalty to New York and want greatly to help the city thrive when it’s down. Taking on that calling means staying active: chatting with their doormen, taking a walk with masks, and continuing to shop from their neighborhood go-to retailers. They even look back fondly on the time that a fellow pedestrian snapped at Mr. Panichgul for taking off his mask for a second while walking their dog — a reminder that someone in New York is always watching. “It’s kind of a circus community experience, but it makes us feel like New Yorkers,” Mr. Spina said. “I’d feel guilty to leave.”

Continue following our fashion and lifestyle coverage on Facebook (Styles and Modern Love), Twitter (Styles, Fashion and Weddings) and Instagram.

Source: www.nytimes.com

Author: Stephanie Cain


I hate that my friends still get help from their parents and were born into money. I want to stop comparing. How can I do this?

I hate that my friends still get help from their parents and were born into money. I want to stop comparing. How can I do this?

I am an avid reader of your column and have realized a pattern in myself that I am less than proud of. I am in my early 30s, and my partner is in her late 20s. We do well for ourselves, we travel, we aren’t struggling. I own a nice home in a town a few hours away that I rent out because I recently moved to the city.

We are renting in the city now to save money. We have a roommate, and I feel that some friends judge us for this. Our friends are successful and all around our age. They are building extravagant homes, making what I believe to be more money than us, and I can’t help but be green with envy and always comparing what they have to what we don’t.

Dispatches from a pandemic: Letter from New York: ‘New Yorkers wear colorful homemade masks, while nurses wear garbage bags’

I hate that my friends still get help from their parents and were born into money. They have no student-loan debt, one friend is a lawyer and her parents paid for that degree. One couple got their land for their home paid off by their family. I have had to work hard for everything I have in life, as well as my partner, and it’s just hard seeing them get ahead while we feel like we’re stagnant.

I want to be happy for them and stop comparing. How can I do this?

Feeling Green

Dear Green,

Your feelings about your friends are as real as your feeling that they’re judging you for having a roommate. They are as real as you believe them to be. While you reflect upon your own relatively modest circumstances, I would bet that your lodger is the last thing on their minds.

We all belong to infinitesimally small social groups: our family, friends, coworkers, neighbors, school friends and/or college alumni. Regaining perspective on your life and your finances is sometimes a more difficult task than it sounds. Do we look beyond our neighborhood, social group, country or need to fly to the moon? It’s better to look inward than beyond the garden gate.

The Green-Eyed Monster likely resides somewhere in your past. On an intellectual level, you know that this has zero to do with how you feel about your friends: You clearly wish them well. Nor does it have anything to do with how they feel about you: They likely admire you for reasons you have never considered. This has everything to do with how you feel about yourself.

Each one of these groups can make us feel “high status” or “low status.” That’s an exercise I learned as a kid in drama school. We’d each take turns being the snooty shopkeeper and nervous customer. But this scenario plays out in real life, too. Here’s the weird part: We can read about Hollywood actors or people who have valiantly survived some terrible calamity, and feel curiously numb.

Movie stars may have a $20 million Beverly Hills home, but they make up a constellation of Greek gods, right? We are merely orbiting their firmament. Why on earth would we or they feel wanton? Surely, they don’t have real problems. And people who earn less in a month than some Americans do in an hour ? They’re a world away from our experiences, aren’t they?

Don’t miss:‘We will not have a vaccine by next winter.’ Like the 1918 Spanish flu, CDC says second wave of coronavirus could be worse. So what happens now?

The more we have, the more we feel like we don’t have enough. And we’re all chasing something. That’s why they call it a rat race. Rats are not the most delicate of creatures, but they sure know how to run. “Our sense of an appropriate limit to anything — for example, to wealth and esteem — is never decided independently,” the philosopher Alain de Botton writes in his book “Status Anxiety.”

That treatise chops, dices and vacuum packs the age-old malady of consumerism, and how we all compare ourselves to others. “It is decided by comparing our condition with that of a reference group, with that of people we consider to be our equals. We cannot appreciate what we have in isolation, nor judged against the lives of our medieval forbearers,” Botton adds.

“If we have a pleasant home and comfortable job, however, but learn through ill-advised attendance at a school reunion that some of our old friends (there is no stronger reference group) are now living in houses larger than our own, bought on the proceeds of more enticing occupations, we are likely to return home nursing a violent sense of misfortune,” he writes.

“It is the feeling that we might be something other than what we are — a feeling transmitted by the superior achievements of those we take to be our equals — that generates anxiety and resentment,” he adds. “If we are small and live among people who are all of own height, we will not be unduly troubled by questions of size.”

What do I do to right-size myself? When I lived in London in my 20s, I visited the National Portrait Gallery when I was feeling blue. I would gaze at people who lived hundreds of years ago: Peasants, royalty, aristocrats or, perhaps, a portrait of a young man sitting wistfully in a window contemplating nothing but the day. It always put my own trials and tribulations in perspective.

I felt grateful to have leisure time that a textile worker during the Industrial Revolution could only dream of. Time is the most valuable commodity we have. It’s a brutal wake-up call, and a useful reminder that this “compare and despair” does not always change along with our improved circumstances.

This status consciousness starts with our siblings getting a bigger dollop of ice cream or the largest dinner plate, and ends up with us grumbling about the annex on our neighbor’s house. Call up one of your wealthy friends, and ask them how they’re doing. And then call up another friend who has far less than you. You may be surprised to discover that they have a lot in common.

The Moneyist: My son is staying with me, yet my financially irresponsible ex-husband received his $500 stimulus check. Is my ex right to keep it?

Source: www.marketwatch.com

Author: Quentin Fottrell


Saying Goodbye to Long Tall Sally

Saying Goodbye to Long Tall Sally

A label dedicated to outfitting tall shoppers for 44 years.

The fashion industry is in a state of emergency. This has been made clear not only by the mounting bankruptcies of big-name retailers, but also by the closure of beloved small businesses. These are brands that won’t bounce back.

There have never been many places to buy a pair of black leather ankle boots in size 13 — about four sizes larger than the widely accepted average size for women’s shoes. Now, with the closure of Long Tall Sally, there are even fewer.

That news, announced by the 44-year-old British retailer, resulted in “a quite tangible outpouring of grief,” said Vicky Shepherd, the company’s spokeswoman.

Long Tall Sally sells women’s wear and accessories for tall people: pants with extended inseams, tops designed for longer torsos, shoes up to size 15. The clothes are uncomplicated and office friendly, appealing to broad swaths of shoppers — more Gap than Fashion Nova, though at a higher price point. It is the only retailer of its kind, where tall shoppers can browse a diverse inventory without worrying about hemlines landing three inches above the point they’re supposed to land. They’re not confined to one department in a shop; everything is made for them.

The store will cease operations at the end of August, citing in its closing announcement the “very sudden and very profound impact of Covid-19.”

Even before the global pandemic, Long Tall Sally was struggling, largely because of growing competition from affordable e-commerce behemoths like Asos offering tall categories, Ms. Shepherd said. In 2018, the company began moving entirely online, closing the brick-and-mortar stores that were once spread across Britain, Germany and North America. (The United States presently accounts for 35 percent of sales, according to Ms. Shepherd.)

“We really, really tried to make it work,” Ms. Shepherd said. “But the curse of Covid — it has rocked us, and we can’t see how we can claw back from it.”

Long Tall Sally was founded in London in 1976 by Judy Rich, a then 33-year-old American entrepreneur who had been six feet tall since she was 13. She named her West End store after the Little Richard song, initially offering three sizes. Back then, she had to knock on manufacturers’ doors herself to ask them to make sleeves two inches longer. But the first store was “almost immediately successful,” she said.

“It was powered by feminism and a crusade and a pioneering spirit — because I felt tall women were being discriminated against,” Ms. Rich said. “I have had the experience of going into stores and people looking at me and shaking their heads.”

Ms. Rich, who sold the company in 2005, learned of Long Tall Sally’s closure a few days before the public was told. She wasn’t surprised by the thousands of disappointed comments left on social media. (“So sad to hear,” Crystal Langhorne, a W.N.B.A. player, wrote on Instagram. “You will be truly missed.”) The store may never have become a household name, but if you were a tall woman who liked to shop online, you very likely knew it.

Updated June 24, 2020

Scientists around the country have tried to identify everyday materials that do a good job of filtering microscopic particles. In recent tests, HEPA furnace filters scored high, as did vacuum cleaner bags, fabric similar to flannel pajamas and those of 600-count pillowcases. Other materials tested included layered coffee filters and scarves and bandannas. These scored lower, but still captured a small percentage of particles.

A commentary published this month on the website of the British Journal of Sports Medicine points out that covering your face during exercise “comes with issues of potential breathing restriction and discomfort” and requires “balancing benefits versus possible adverse events.” Masks do alter exercise, says Cedric X. Bryant, the president and chief science officer of the American Council on Exercise, a nonprofit organization that funds exercise research and certifies fitness professionals. “In my personal experience,” he says, “heart rates are higher at the same relative intensity when you wear a mask.” Some people also could experience lightheadedness during familiar workouts while masked, says Len Kravitz, a professor of exercise science at the University of New Mexico.

The steroid, dexamethasone, is the first treatment shown to reduce mortality in severely ill patients, according to scientists in Britain. The drug appears to reduce inflammation caused by the immune system, protecting the tissues. In the study, dexamethasone reduced deaths of patients on ventilators by one-third, and deaths of patients on oxygen by one-fifth.

The coronavirus emergency relief package gives many American workers paid leave if they need to take time off because of the virus. It gives qualified workers two weeks of paid sick leave if they are ill, quarantined or seeking diagnosis or preventive care for coronavirus, or if they are caring for sick family members. It gives 12 weeks of paid leave to people caring for children whose schools are closed or whose child care provider is unavailable because of the coronavirus. It is the first time the United States has had widespread federally mandated paid leave, and includes people who don’t typically get such benefits, like part-time and gig economy workers. But the measure excludes at least half of private-sector workers, including those at the country’s largest employers, and gives small employers significant leeway to deny leave.

So far, the evidence seems to show it does. A widely cited paper published in April suggests that people are most infectious about two days before the onset of coronavirus symptoms and estimated that 44 percent of new infections were a result of transmission from people who were not yet showing symptoms. Recently, a top expert at the World Health Organization stated that transmission of the coronavirus by people who did not have symptoms was “very rare,” but she later walked back that statement.

Touching contaminated objects and then infecting ourselves with the germs is not typically how the virus spreads. But it can happen. A number of studies of flu, rhinovirus, coronavirus and other microbes have shown that respiratory illnesses, including the new coronavirus, can spread by touching contaminated surfaces, particularly in places like day care centers, offices and hospitals. But a long chain of events has to happen for the disease to spread that way. The best way to protect yourself from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and wearing masks.

A study by European scientists is the first to document a strong statistical link between genetic variations and Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Having Type A blood was linked to a 50 percent increase in the likelihood that a patient would need to get oxygen or to go on a ventilator, according to the new study.

The unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent in May, the Labor Department said on June 5, an unexpected improvement in the nation’s job market as hiring rebounded faster than economists expected. Economists had forecast the unemployment rate to increase to as much as 20 percent, after it hit 14.7 percent in April, which was the highest since the government began keeping official statistics after World War II. But the unemployment rate dipped instead, with employers adding 2.5 million jobs, after more than 20 million jobs were lost in April.

Common symptoms include fever, a dry cough, fatigue and difficulty breathing or shortness of breath. Some of these symptoms overlap with those of the flu, making detection difficult, but runny noses and stuffy sinuses are less common. The C.D.C. has also added chills, muscle pain, sore throat, headache and a new loss of the sense of taste or smell as symptoms to look out for. Most people fall ill five to seven days after exposure, but symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as many as 14 days.

If air travel is unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. Most important: Wash your hands often, and stop touching your face. If possible, choose a window seat. A study from Emory University found that during flu season, the safest place to sit on a plane is by a window, as people sitting in window seats had less contact with potentially sick people. Disinfect hard surfaces. When you get to your seat and your hands are clean, use disinfecting wipes to clean the hard surfaces at your seat like the head and arm rest, the seatbelt buckle, the remote, screen, seat back pocket and the tray table. If the seat is hard and nonporous or leather or pleather, you can wipe that down, too. (Using wipes on upholstered seats could lead to a wet seat and spreading of germs rather than killing them.)

If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

One vocal contingent among the many mourners was tall transgender women, who had for years praised Long Tall Sally’s selection while swapping shopping tips online.

“When I go to Long Tall Sally, I know I’m going to find something that can fit me,” said Rachel Wheeler, 39, a shopper in southern England who often bought basics (like jeans and shoes) from the store.

“I am stuck,” she said. “I have no idea what I’m going to do.”

Source: www.nytimes.com

Author: Jessica Testa


Amid Black Lives Matter movement, PAFA has more work to do | Opinion

Amid Black Lives Matter movement, PAFA has more work to do | Opinion

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is the oldest accredited art school and museum in the United States. It was founded 60 years before the abolition of slavery and maintains an important legacy both in this country and in the city of Philadelphia. Alums include some of the most well-known American historical art figures and contemporary art stars, from Thomas Eakins and Mary Cassatt to Njideka Akunyili Crosby and David Lynch.

In 2020, PAFA’s cultural standing is in jeopardy. In the midst of this important moment, when the country is holding up a mirror to its own inherent white supremacist infrastructure, PAFA, with its glaringly white leadership, remains incapable of real self-reflection.

This was exemplified on June 12, when faculty received an email cautioning them not to publicly affiliate themselves with PAFA when participating in a protest or signing a petition. Reported in a recent article in Billy Penn, the email was a direct response to multiple PAFA faculty and staff signing an online petition titled “Philly Arts for Black Lives,” which calls on the city to reinvest in human services over its police department, and supports the Black Lives Matter movement.

Of course, PAFA is not alone as an institution needing systemic changes. Starbucks stumbled in their response to recent events by banning employees from wearing Black Lives Matter apparel, though after much outcry it reversed the policy. Closer to home, the South Street Whole Foods was the scene of a protest this week as employees hoped to reverse a company policy banning clothing and accessories with insignia and slogans, including Black Lives Matter gear.

Unlike these two examples, however, PAFA is not a for-profit company, but a nonprofit institution of higher learning. Its community is not comprised of employees and customers, rather staff and students who place their trust in them. Nonaffiliation policies are not uncommon for private institutions, but enforcing one only after faculty express their support of BLM speaks to what — and who — PAFA considers a priority. The article sparked online outcry over the institution’s behavior from current students, faculty, and alums, all of whom were outraged but not particularly surprised. This is not the first time the school has been criticized for being damagingly ignorant to the needs of its broader community.

PAFA president and CEO David Brigham’s response to the article was disturbingly out of touch. Claiming vaguely that “facts in this story were not reported accurately or were misinterpreted,” and that PAFA’s policy is on par with other institutions, he pointed to a number of initiatives that PAFA has taken toward “critically examining [its] own practices in order to do more to advance the causes of racial justice and equity in the future.” This includes a years-old “formal commitment to diversity” and a “Belonging Task Force,” neither of which has a transparent agenda, or resulted in clearly visible change within the infrastructure of the school.

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PAFA is happy to take the tuition money of its Black and other students of color, but turns its back on real, lasting infrastructural change that could support a safe and anti-racist environment within the school.

As a 2012 PAFA graduate who continues to live and work in Philadelphia, I feel embarrassed to be associated with a school that is so woefully antiquated in its approach to navigating the current political climate. I am ashamed to be an alumna of an institution so preoccupied with remaining neutral that it is incapable of taking a stand for basic human decency and basic rights for their Black students and colleagues or supporting its faculty in their pursuit of equity.

Samantha Mitchell is a Philadelphia-based artist, writer, and arts educator. She lives in Germantown.

Source: www.inquirer.com

Author: Samantha Mitchell, For The Inquirer


Kasasa Ranks Third in Austin Business Journal's

Kasasa Ranks Third in Austin Business Journal’s “2020 Best Places to Work in Austin”

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Source: www.tmcnet.com


AVLF Continues Its Work During Trying Times

AVLF Continues Its Work During Trying Times

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    Embracing Work-Life Balance at the Dining Room Table


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