5 Remote Work Lessons, From The Person Grooming Billion Dollar People

5 Remote Work Lessons, From The Person Grooming Billion Dollar People

Insights about going remote from the person running an institution defined by its physical space Public shaming, in this era of rapid judgment and ensuing internet outrage, is nothing new. But the pandemic has made it a popular pastime. Runners have been berated for exercising without masks. City dwellers have been criticized for congregating in parks. And beachgoers have been condemned for hitting the sand. The pandemic has heightened the Some IndyCar drivers are nervous heading into Saturday’s season-opening race at Texas Agnes Martin was devoted to making paintings full of inner love, to cheer us up when we really needed it. Like now. Experts say shaming other individuals for going against the rules — or for at least appearing to — isn’t usually the best route to take. Here’s why we do it, and why we shouldn’t. Support Black business owners by putting your money where your mouth is — quite literally.

The Garage

If you visited Northwestern University pre-Covid, you’d be surprised by the burgeoning entrepreneurial energy on campus. Anchored by its 11,000 square foot space called The Garage, over 60 student hatched startups are working through the trials and tribulations of growing a business.

This was not always the scene at Northwestern. 

In 2015, Melissa Kaufman, a former Googler and startup founder, came to Northwestern to start The Garage and spark a culture of entrepreneurship. In short order, The Garage became a notable institution on campus, where students finally had an environment to tap into their business ingenuity. 

Melissa will tell you though that the goal of The Garage is not to incubate the next tech unicorn. Instead, it’s to create an environment of self-discovery where students can learn experientially what it takes to be an entrepreneur. It’s about learning how to persevere, understand customer desires, and finding ways to adapt and iterate, among many other skills you won’t find in a textbook. Melissa will be quick to tell you that they are building billion dollar people, not companies.

How then, do you take such a special environment, and recreate it online?

1. Acknowledge remote will be a game of trial and error

Much of the magic of The Garage stems from its community. If you step into the building during any part of the day or night, you’ll find teams working towards their startups goals. 

Being in the close presence of other entrepreneurs creates a shared energy that everyone is in their respective journeys together. Here, entrepreneurship is normalized. 

Add networking events, guest speakers, and family dinners among its members, and you have the ingredients for a special place. 

The Garage then is a uniquely physical experience, and Melissa understood this from the get go. Going remote as a result of Covid would mean a totally new Garage experience. Moreover, like any business, it would take trial and error to get it right. 

2. Create new online social guidelines

At The Garage, similar to strong office environments, the lean-over-the-shoulder knowledge sharing is strong. With everyone working towards common goals, it’s easy to ask a nearby team what marketing channels have been the most successful for them and why, or what lawyer they recommend to help manage contracts. It’s open-source startup knowledge. Everyone wants to help each other.

But how do you recreate this knowledge environment online? Per Melissa, there is no perfect solution. Instead, you have to adapt to the reality of being online and distributed. 

In the case of many organizations, including The Garage, Slack has become the new digital 24/7 office. All workplace communication and interaction are anchored around Slack. 

Unlike talking to a colleague next to you though where a response is quick, Melissa found though that many Slack messages might go unaddressed, or would have delayed response. This led to students avoiding sending messages due to fear of being ignored. 

Now The Garage has set guidelines, that were in fact put together by a student, to message others on Slack when you see the green availability dot, and encourage students to respond in group chats if no one has responded yet. 

While this may seem obvious to many, it’s not. When moving online, you can’t take anything for granted, and you need to set recommendations for all those tools you use, whether it be Slack or Zoom, to create the best possible online office space.

3. Scrap what doesn’t translate online

In person events are a key benefit of joining The Garage. From bringing in guest speakers like Katrina Lake to arranging meetings with Elon Musk’s mom, Mark Cuban, and Brian Cheskey, The Garage gives students special opportunities to learn from those with unique perspectives.

To replace these events, Melissa tried virtual Founder Talks. She soon found that they felt robotic. They reflected more of a classroom lecture as opposed to the vibrant, casual atmosphere typical of Garage events. 

Not everything in person could be replicated online and these larger, virtual talks were scrapped. 

4. Actively Puppeteer

Many students at The Garage will tell you how serendipitous conversations or events there have created defining moments in their business journey. At a Garage family dinner, for example, you might sit next to someone who will help you build your initial product concept.

Unsurprisingly, there is no natural way to recreate these moments online. Inspired by Google, where their micro kitchen concept was intentionally designed to create collisions to spark teamwork and ideation, Melissa decided to instrument these collisions herself online. 

Now, she works with Garage members to understand where others in their community can help, and will actively facilitate those conversations and introductions. She actively nudges team leaders to talk to one another to help ensure mutual accountability. It’s more work, but these connections are invaluable. 

5. Host online-first events

Prior to Covid, The Garage had planned to host an in-person business competition where $300,000 would be given away to the top teams. For young companies, it’s a big sum that can be game changing.

With the competition being pushed online, Melissa and her team decided to rethink the entire event to be online only. They set up individual tracks based on business segments via Zoom where winners would advance. While this was held virtually, it was not publicized. Everything culminated into a final professionally produced one hour livecast which was well attended, fun, and highly engaging. 

Melissa and her team understood that keeping one’s attention online is very different than doing so in person. A three hour non-stop online event could be challenging. They focused the competition on what they believed their audience cared about the most, the finals and prize announcements, and made sure they knocked it out of the park. Moreover, it was accessible to anyone.

Silver linings

Recreating a special and unique in-person environment like The Garage is nearly impossible, no matter how hard you try.

However, there are silver linings. From instrumenting micro collisions, to setting communication guidelines, to making events that could be broadcast globally, these learnings will carry back to the physical world. When The Garage reopens, it will be better than ever.

Source: www.forbes.com

Author: Neal Taparia


Public shaming has become a common pastime during the pandemic. But it doesn't really work

Public shaming has become a common pastime during the pandemic. But it doesn’t really work

Public shaming, in this era of rapid judgment and ensuing internet outrage, is nothing new. But the pandemic has made it a popular pastime.

Runners have been berated for exercising without masks. City dwellers have been criticized for congregating in parks. And beachgoers have been condemned for hitting the sand.

The pandemic has heightened the stakes for every small decision we make about our lives, and people are naturally on edge. But experts say shaming other individuals for apparently going against the rules — or, public shaming for what you may perceive as public good — isn’t usually the best route to take.

Here’s why we shame others — and why we shouldn’t.

It’s often a natural response: Shaming or scolding others for not abiding by the rules is a natural response, says June Tangney, a clinical psychologist and professor at George Mason University.

The pandemic has people understandably worried about their safety. So when someone acts in a way that appears to be putting others at risk, we might get scared or angry. And one way we might express those emotions is by aggressively confronting those who are engaging in behaviors that make us feel uncomfortable.

“When we’re scared and when we see people doing something that endangers all of us, it’s a natural tendency to want to shame them,” Tangney said. “It’s just not a good approach if, bottom line, you want to see their behavior change.”

We may feel like we’re missing out: The impulse to shame someone else might also be driven by FOMO, or the fear of missing out, Tangney said.

Perhaps you’ve been diligently wearing a mask on the rare occasions you leave the house, and you haven’t been socializing with others. Then you see the images circulating on the internet of runners and cyclists not wearing masks, of people hanging out at crowded pool parties or of beachgoers enjoying a sunny weekend.

We already know that mass gatherings can endanger lives by potentially spreading the virus to large numbers of people, prolonging and worsening the devastation we’re already navigating. So it’s normal to feel frustrated by such scenarios, though it’s worth noting that some, like running and cycling outside, are relatively low risk.

“We get this image of half a country having a party that most of us are not doing,” Tangney said. “It’s natural to become angry and also be afraid and to want to shame people, because we believe if we shame them, they’ll stop doing this bad thing. But unfortunately that doesn’t seem to be the case.”

The thing about shaming is that it doesn’t really work, says Tangney.

It can have the opposite effect: Scolding someone for not following the rules is usually done with the intention of changing that person’s behavior. But it typically has the opposite effect.

People don’t like being told what to do. And when they’re shamed for behaviors that just months ago felt harmless, they’re likely to feel attacked and become defensive, Tangney said. Instead of complying, they might minimize or deny any harm their actions may be causing.

“You’re more likely to hit a brick wall,” she said. “And if anything, they’re going to dig their heels in and be less likely to think about grandma and the other people at home or whomever they’re seeing.”

It drives the behavior underground: Shaming doesn’t mean that people won’t engage in risky behaviors. Rather, it drives the behaviors underground, says Julia Marcus, an infectious disease epidemiologist and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School.

It’s something Marcus knows well from her work as an HIV researcher. Abstinence-only messaging doesn’t work for sex, research shows. Telling people to refrain from seeing their friends or going outside for an indefinite period of time won’t work either.

“When we have an all-or-nothing approach to prevention, which is what we’ve been seeing in our public health messaging around the coronavirus, we tend to inadvertently stigmatize anything people do that’s not 100% risk reduction,” she said.

She gives a hypothetical example of a group of people getting singled out for congregating in a pool. The group may then choose not to gather again publicly for fear of backlash. Instead, they might hold a house party indoors, where they’re safe from public view — but in an enclosed space, where the risk of infection is higher.

If an outbreak occurred in that instance and contact tracers were trying to determine who has been exposed, the people who attended the party may be afraid to acknowledge that they were at the event — and health officials can’t reliably contain the virus.

“Then our public health response ends up breaking down,” Marcus said.

To avoid that breakdown and the high-risk pool party itself, Marcus says our public health messaging needs to convey nuance. People need to feel as though they have other options for social contact so that they don’t feel compelled to behave in high-risk ways.

It turns us into the behavior police: The guidance around whether masks should be worn and how the virus is transmitted are constantly evolving. Different states have different restrictions. And federal, state and local authorities have often implemented rules that conflict with each other, making things confusing for everyday citizens.

Nancy Berlinger, research scholar at bioethics think tank The Hastings Center, said messaging on when and how to wear masks needs to be clearer.

“In these everyday interactions with masks, should everyone be turning themselves into the mask police?” she said. “Or should we absolutely make sure that everyone understands why this is important, how to do it, where to get masks and figure out friendly ways of encouraging each other?”

It makes assumptions about others’ behaviors: We don’t always know someone else’s situation.

Maybe that the shopper you’re side-eyeing at the grocery store just forgot to wear a mask, or perhaps they don’t have access to one. Those people you see crowded next to each other on blankets in parks might be a part of the same household, or they might have formed a double bubble. And others may feel unsafe wearing masks because of their race.

And the photos of seemingly crowded public spaces that often make the rounds online can be misleading, because different camera lenses can affect the appearance of depth.

It exploits our biases: Shaming people who aren’t following the rules could also align with other biases about who does things wrong in a society, says Berlinger.

“Do you notice teenagers not wearing masks but you don’t notice other middle aged people like yourself?” she asks.

Shame is connected to power, Berlinger said, and those who publicly call out others for supposedly violating safety protocols often feel as if they can do so without consequences. Nonwhite people generally don’t have that privilege, and are also disproportionately targeted by law enforcement for violating safety protocols.

It misplaces blame: Scolding people for seemingly violating safety norms also places blame on individuals for our current situation, instead of holding institutions accountable, says Marcus.

“Shaming individuals who are at a party or in a park may give us a sense of control in the moment, but it’s misplaced energy,” Marcus said.

Individuals do carry some responsibility in reducing a community’s risk, she said. But in the grand scheme of things, most cases in the US are not arising from pool parties and other outdoor activities. Rather, they appear to be originating from so-called “superspreader events,” where an infected person attends an indoor gathering with large numbers of people, like funerals, birthday parties or religious gatherings.

Fixating on individuals who are flouting the rules distracts from wider, institutional failures to scale up testing and contact tracing so that society can reopen safely, Marcus said.

If you see someone behaving in ways that are risky or make you feel uncomfortable, there are still some things you can do.

Consider a kinder approach: Instead of aggressively confronting someone about not wearing a mask, you can kindly ask them to put one on. Share what your concerns are, and let the other person ultimately make the decision for themselves.

“The approach itself is the most important thing,” said life coach and columnist Susie Moore.

Make your request as easy as possible: If you’re concerned that someone isn’t wearing a mask, offer them one.

Give them the benefit of the doubt: There’s a lot of fear and anger being felt right now, and a little compassion can go a long way.

“It’s okay to remember that we’re all human beings, we’re still figuring it out and we can still talk to each other kindly,” she said.

Our current moment will continue to require collective action, and that includes doing what we can to keep each other safe. But we are navigating new norms and a new normal. So we, accustomed to a world of judge-first-assess-later, need to embrace something else anew: empathy and understanding — from everyone.

Source: ktvz.com

Author: By CNN


IndyCar drivers uncertain how aeroscreen will work at Texas

IndyCar drivers uncertain how aeroscreen will work at Texas

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Graham Rahal admits he is nervous about Saturday’s race.

He is a little leery about opening the IndyCar season at one of the series’ trickiest tracks — without testing, with limited practice time and revised tire rules. He is also curious how IndyCar’s newest safety feature, the windscreen, will perform in its long-awaited and long-delayed debut.

“This is going to be a first for us — the glare, the pitting, does it get beat up on an oval, just the visibility standpoint, the heat, all of these things on an oval,” Rahal said. “We just don’t have any answers for that.”

Series officials started searching in earnest for another safety device for their open cockpits after Justin Wilson died in August 2015 after being hit in the head by a broken part from another car. Formula One incorporated a protective “halo” in 2018. Then, in May 2019, IndyCar officials announced they would add the Red Bull Advanced Technologies version to its cars this season.

The clear wraparound screen is anchored to the cockpit with a titanium frame and includes an anti-fogging heat. The company says this windscreen will be as safe as the F1 device and can withstand 17 tons of force.

“We feel really good about where we’re at with those,” IndyCar President Jay Frye said. “It’s a total driver safety solution and no expense has been spared.”

Twenty-seven drivers used the protective halo during a two-day test on the Circuit of the Americas, a road course in Austin, Texas, that was limited because of bad weather. Afterward, defending series champion Simon Pagenaud of Team Penske told reporters the windscreen added more weight to the front and changed the balance of the car.

Drivers believe they will have to continue making adjustments throughout the season, adjustments that already could be in place if not for the COVID-19 shutdown. Series officials made one change following the February test by adding an anti-glare component to the device.

The screen was supposed to make its debut in the milder March temperatures of Florida and on the slower road course at St. Petersburg. Instead, the revised schedule moved the introduction to Texas, a high-speed oval and a race known for its searing heat. Saturday’s forecast calls for temperatures in the mid-90s when drivers will be holding practice and qualifying before the race at night.

Add all that to the fact the screen still hasn’t been tested on an oval in a season where nothing yet has gone according to plan and it’s understandable why drivers who don’t blink about racing at speeds over 200 miles per hour (321.87 kilometres per hour) suddenly feel uneasy about something new.

“Obviously, Texas is a really hot race, and it’s already pretty physically demanding just because of that fact,” 2016 Indianapolis 500 winner Alexander Rossi said. “With the screen, it’s going to be quite a bit hotter, so is it going to make that big of a difference or not? We haven’t really tested it, so we don’t really know.”

Throughout testing, some drivers complained the titanium rod from the center of the cockpit split the sight lines into two frames. But as time went on, drivers acknowledged, they got used to it. Drivers also had a chance to work with the new screen on simulators during the brief iRacing series.

They know, however, that the simulator is not the same thing and the only way to get real answers is time on the track.

“It’s an incredible innovation from IndyCar,” said Canadian driver James Hinchcliffe, Rossi’s teammate with Andretti Autosport. “There are a lot of question marks still. We haven’t run it on an oval, we haven’t run it at night, so we’re all going to kind of be learning on the fly.”

Naturally, drivers will use different strategies Saturday.

Zach Veach, who also races for Andretti, plans to use tinted tear-offs on his visor to battle any sun glare, as he has the last two years at Texas. Charlie Kimball is hoping he can get acclimated quickly enough with his new team, A.J. Foyt Racing, to compete for the win.

Rahal will just try to make the best of it.

“We’ve never done a one-day thing without proper testing, and the windshield, as well, the aeroscreen, especially for the race starting slightly early is unusual, which means I think we have direct sun, too,” Rahal said. “How it’s going to affect us, we just don’t know. But hopefully we are capable enough to make a great show for it.”

___

AP Auto Racing Writer Jenna Fryer and AP Sports Writer Stephen Hawkins contributed to this report.

___

More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Source: www.baynews9.com

Author: PUBLISHED 2:25 AM ET Jun. 05, 2020


Friendship: Will Gompertz reviews the work by US artist Agnes Martin ★★★★★

Friendship: Will Gompertz reviews the work by US artist Agnes Martin ★★★★★

I was looking at an online image of an abstract painting called Friendship by the late American artist Agnes Martin (1912 – 2004) when my son lent over my shoulder to take a look.

“What’s it made out of? he asked

“Gold leaf” I said.

“When was it painted?”

“1963.”

“How big is it?”

“Over six-foot square. Isn’t it great!”

“Probably better in the flesh” he said, and wandered off.

He was unimpressed, and I don’t blame him.

At first glance, especially on a computer screen where all sense of scale and materiality are lost, the painting looks flat and lifeless. But give it half a chance, zoom in and out a bit, and you will discover a modern masterpiece that offers a much-needed balm for our troubled times.

Friendship is the product of decades of trial and error that saw Agnes Martin go from figurative painting to Rothko-like floating colour fields via the biomorphic surrealism of Joan Miró.

In the early years of her career, Martin was influenced by the biomorphic surrealism of Miró (Harlequin’s Carnival, 1924-25)

Martin was then drawn to Mark Rothko’s style (Red, Orange, Orange on Red, 1962)

Almost all of this early work ended up on a bonfire.

Finally, in her mid-40s, which was in the late ’50s, she found a style of painting and a subject – positive feelings – that would sustain her for the rest of her life.

The result was a remarkable, unique body of work that brings our unconscious into plain sight.

We know what companionship is, we know what it feels like, but what does the sensation of mutual affection actually look like? It’s not something we spend much time thinking about, unlike Agnes Martin who contemplated the manifestation of our inner sensations for five decades.

Friendship (1963) is an early foray into her quest to make our feelings visible. At the time she was living in the semi-derelict lofts on the Coenties Slip near Wall Street in New York; hanging out with the Abstract Expressionist crowd and thinking about the paintings made by her friend Elsworth Kelly, which consisted of large blocks of colour.

Friendship (Gold leaf and oil on canvas, 6′ 3″ x 6′ 3″) was painted in 1963 by Agnes Martin, who once wrote “Without awareness of beauty, innocence and happiness, one cannot make works of art”

But colour alone wasn’t enough for her.

There had to be an order to things, a formal structure through which the expressive nature of paint could be contained and communicated. Her solution to the problem was simple yet brilliant, as you can see with Friendship.

Having applied the gold leaf to the huge canvas she stood back and contemplated her next move. Rothko would probably have left well alone, as would Kelly. But Agnes knew her painting lacked depth. It was superficial.

She had to get under its skin to reveal its soul.

And so, she began to score the surface with a series of horizontal and vertical lines until the entire image appeared to have been made on a piece of giant graph-paper.

The effect was incredible.

What had been a completely flat image the viewer perceived as a single, static unit, suddenly became a three-dimensional painting full of life and intrigue. Crucially, the geometric lines were hand-drawn by Agnes, not machine-made, which meant they were full of tiny human errors, giving the surface a jittery, vibrating quality that entices you to look closer. And when you do, you realise there’s a red undercoat bleeding through the patchy golden surface.

A closer look at the painting reveals extraordinary detail with red coming through the golden work

It turns out Friendship is far from superficial. It has depth and breadth and intelligence. But, most of all, it has feeling.

It is an uplifting painting celebrating affinity, which Martin arouses and exposes with a joyous ebullience. This is what the feeling of friendship looks like: warm, rich, glowing, textured and imperfect.

The gold leaf was an anomaly for Martin who believed in humility and detested pride.

Her palette would quickly evolve into more muted colours – greys, browns and blacks – before settling on pastel shades of blue, pink, and off-white. But her subject remained the same: emotions such as happiness, love, and innocence. As did her dedication to geometric structures and what would come to be known as the Agnes Martin “grid”‘.

The Agnes Martin “Grid” became the artist’s hallmark

Take any one of her hundreds of pictures and you will see the same effect, the simultaneous play between the faultless and the faulty, certainty and uncertainty. It’s there in an early work like The Rose (1964) and in a later piece such as Loving Love (2000). It is what gives her paintings their personality, their appeal. Our eyes and minds are intrigued by the constant play between perception (perfect) and reality (imperfect), one resolving the other like a musical chord.

The Rose (1964) by Martin, who said “the beauty is not in the rose, the beauty is in your mind”

Loving Love was painted by Agnes Martin in 2000, four years before her death

There is little doubt that her fragile mental state informed her paintings. She was seeking tranquillity and order among chaos; to create images of beauty and happiness to dispel dark thoughts. She did so with a form of meditation, the purpose of which was to banish the act of thinking entirely. Her mind, once cleared, waited patiently in a semi-trance for an image to appear in her a head – an “inspiration” – which would show her the next painting to make. This is not as bizarre as it sounds, you hear artists of all types talking about a similar process to overcome “writer’s block” or waiting for the “creative spark”. Novelists speak of a book “writing itself” with them merely the conduits.

The way she achieved a state in which she could receive an inspiration, was to be completely alone with a giant Do Not Disturb sign hanging above her head for all to see from miles around.

That’s perfectly normal. What makes her situation different, is the extremes to which she took the notion of seclusion.

Agnes Martin didn’t so much get by without mod cons, but without any cons whatsoever. She lived alone on an isolated mesa in New Mexico with no running water or mains electricity. Admittedly, she did own a bath. Not tucked away in a cosy corner of her adobe shack, mind you, but outside in the yard. She would fill it with buckets of cold water at 10am and hope that by 4pm, shortly before the sun went down, it would be warm enough to bathe in.

It’s been said that neighbours who popped round offering cake and cookies were welcomed with the business end of her gun. And paintings she made that failed to live up to her exacting standards were lacerated and destroyed with a knife, accounting for about 95% of her life’s work.

If inspiration didn’t call she wouldn’t paint that day, week, or month. On one occasion, after a very successful show of her geometric abstract art in the 1960s, she downed tools completely. For seven years.

The photographer Michele Mattei captured the essence of Agnes Martin in her studio in Taos, New Mexico a few months before her death, and described the artist as “a woman of few words, focused on her own private thoughts”

The story goes that she once told a man who thought they were pals that she didn’t have any friends, and he was one of them (in truth she did have friends, and enjoyed giving public lectures). If you were to form an instant opinion of this reclusive artist who spent forty years of her life drawing grids on 6ft x 6ft canvases, the inclination would be to conclude she was a dyed-in-the-wool oddball.

There are, however, two explanations for her seemingly erratic behaviour. The first being her Zen-like approach to making art, which required long periods alone, and, secondly, she had schizophrenia. Whether they are interconnected matters not, the point is Agnes Martin wasn’t an oddball.

She was deeply spiritual, highly intelligent, sensitive, focussed, talented, and dedicated artist.

Solitude was her source material just as a landscape painter draws from nature and a portraitist from a sitter. She might have come across a tad ferocious if caught at the wrong time, but that’s not particularly unusual.

The fact is she was devoted to making paintings full of inner love to go out into the world and cheer us up when we really needed it. Like now.

There’s a lot to be said for Friendship.

Recent reviews by Will Gompertz

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  • Who’s Joe Rogan and is his podcast really worth $100m? ★★★☆☆
  • Revelations about Rembrandt’s masterpiece captured on camera ★★★★★
  • Self-taught artist gets top prize: A worthy winner? ★★★☆☆

Follow Will Gompertz on Twitter

Source: news.yahoo.com

Author: Will Gompertz – Arts editor


Public shaming has become a common pastime during the pandemic. But it doesn't really work

Public shaming has become a common pastime during the pandemic. But it doesn’t really work

(CNN)Public shaming, in this era of rapid judgment and ensuing internet outrage, is nothing new. But the pandemic has made it a popular pastime.

Runners have been berated for exercising without masks. City dwellers have been criticized for congregating in parks. And beachgoers have been condemned for hitting the sand.

The pandemic has heightened the stakes for every small decision we make about our lives, and people are naturally on edge. But experts say shaming other individuals for apparently going against the rules — or, public shaming for what you may perceive as public good — isn’t usually the best route to take.

    Here’s why we shame others — and why we shouldn’t.

    Why we do it

    It’s often a natural response: Shaming or scolding others for not abiding by the rules is a natural response, says June Tangney, a clinical psychologist and professor at George Mason University.

    The pandemic has people understandably worried about their safety. So when someone acts in a way that appears to be putting others at risk, we might get scared or angry. And one way we might express those emotions is by aggressively confronting those who are engaging in behaviors that make us feel uncomfortable.

    People in Boston go for a run on April 17.

    “When we’re scared and when we see people doing something that endangers all of us, it’s a natural tendency to want to shame them,” Tangney said. “It’s just not a good approach if, bottom line, you want to see their behavior change.”

    We may feel like we’re missing out: The impulse to shame someone else might also be driven by FOMO, or the fear of missing out, Tangney said.

    Perhaps you’ve been diligently wearing a mask on the rare occasions you leave the house, and you haven’t been socializing with others. Then you see the images circulating on the internet of runners and cyclists not wearing masks, of people hanging out at crowded pool parties or of beachgoers enjoying a sunny weekend.

    We already know that mass gatherings can endanger lives by potentially spreading the virus to large numbers of people, prolonging and worsening the devastation we’re already navigating. So it’s normal to feel frustrated by such scenarios, though it’s worth noting that some, like running and cycling outside, are relatively low risk.

    “We get this image of half a country having a party that most of us are not doing,” Tangney said. “It’s natural to become angry and also be afraid and to want to shame people, because we believe if we shame them, they’ll stop doing this bad thing. But unfortunately that doesn’t seem to be the case.”

    Why it’s usually not effective

    The thing about shaming is that it doesn’t really work, says Tangney.

    It can have the opposite effect: Scolding someone for not following the rules is usually done with the intention of changing that person’s behavior. But it typically has the opposite effect.

    People don’t like being told what to do. And when they’re shamed for behaviors that just months ago felt harmless, they’re likely to feel attacked and become defensive, Tangney said. Instead of complying, they might minimize or deny any harm their actions may be causing.

    “You’re more likely to hit a brick wall,” she said. “And if anything, they’re going to dig their heels in and be less likely to think about grandma and the other people at home or whomever they’re seeing.”

    It drives the behavior underground: Shaming doesn’t mean that people won’t engage in risky behaviors. Rather, it drives the behaviors underground, says Julia Marcus, an infectious disease epidemiologist and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School.

    It’s something Marcus knows well from her work as an HIV researcher. Abstinence-only messaging doesn’t work for sex, research shows. Telling people to refrain from seeing their friends or going outside for an indefinite period of time won’t work either.

    “When we have an all-or-nothing approach to prevention, which is what we’ve been seeing in our public health messaging around the coronavirus, we tend to inadvertently stigmatize anything people do that’s not 100% risk reduction,” she said.

    She gives a hypothetical example of a group of people getting singled out for congregating in a pool. The group may then choose not to gather again publicly for fear of backlash. Instead, they might hold a house party indoors, where they’re safe from public view — but in an enclosed space, where the risk of infection is higher.

    A group of people float on connected inflatables down the American River near Rancho Cordova, California, on Memorial Day Weekend.

    If an outbreak occurred in that instance and contact tracers were trying to determine who has been exposed, the people who attended the party may be afraid to acknowledge that they were at the event — and health officials can’t reliably contain the virus.

    “Then our public health response ends up breaking down,” Marcus said.

    To avoid that breakdown and the high-risk pool party itself, Marcus says our public health messaging needs to convey nuance. People need to feel as though they have other options for social contact so that they don’t feel compelled to behave in high-risk ways.

    Why it can be problematic

    It turns us into the behavior police: The guidance around whether masks should be worn and how the virus is transmitted are constantly evolving. Different states have different restrictions. And federal, state and local authorities have often implemented rules that conflict with each other, making things confusing for everyday citizens.

    Nancy Berlinger, research scholar at bioethics think tank The Hastings Center, said messaging on when and how to wear masks needs to be clearer.

    “In these everyday interactions with masks, should everyone be turning themselves into the mask police?” she said. “Or should we absolutely make sure that everyone understands why this is important, how to do it, where to get masks and figure out friendly ways of encouraging each other?”

    People stand in line to enter a grocery store in Washington, D.C., on April 8.

    It makes assumptions about others’ behaviors: We don’t always know someone else’s situation.

    Maybe that the shopper you’re side-eyeing at the grocery store just forgot to wear a mask, or perhaps they don’t have access to one. Those people you see crowded next to each other on blankets in parks might be a part of the same household, or they might have formed a double bubble. And others may feel unsafe wearing masks because of their race.

    And the photos of seemingly crowded public spaces that often make the rounds online can be misleading, because different camera lenses can affect the appearance of depth.

    It exploits our biases: Shaming people who aren’t following the rules could also align with other biases about who does things wrong in a society, says Berlinger.

    “Do you notice teenagers not wearing masks but you don’t notice other middle aged people like yourself?” she asks.

    Shame is connected to power, Berlinger said, and those who publicly call out others for supposedly violating safety protocols often feel as if they can do so without consequences. Nonwhite people generally don’t have that privilege, and are also disproportionately targeted by law enforcement for violating safety protocols.

    It misplaces blame: Scolding people for seemingly violating safety norms also places blame on individuals for our current situation, instead of holding institutions accountable, says Marcus.

    “Shaming individuals who are at a party or in a park may give us a sense of control in the moment, but it’s misplaced energy,” Marcus said.

    Individuals do carry some responsibility in reducing a community’s risk, she said. But in the grand scheme of things, most cases in the US are not arising from pool parties and other outdoor activities. Rather, they appear to be originating from so-called “superspreader events,” where an infected person attends an indoor gathering with large numbers of people, like funerals, birthday parties or religious gatherings.

    Fixating on individuals who are flouting the rules distracts from wider, institutional failures to scale up testing and contact tracing so that society can reopen safely, Marcus said.

    What we should do instead

    If you see someone behaving in ways that are risky or make you feel uncomfortable, there are still some things you can do.

    Consider a kinder approach: Instead of aggressively confronting someone about not wearing a mask, you can kindly ask them to put one on. Share what your concerns are, and let the other person ultimately make the decision for themselves.

    If you're concerned about someone not wearing a mask, you could offer them one, says life coach Susie Moore.

    “The approach itself is the most important thing,” said life coach and columnist Susie Moore.

    Make your request as easy as possible: If you’re concerned that someone isn’t wearing a mask, offer them one.

    Give them the benefit of the doubt: There’s a lot of fear and anger being felt right now, and a little compassion can go a long way.

      “It’s okay to remember that we’re all human beings, we’re still figuring it out and we can still talk to each other kindly,” she said.

      Our current moment will continue to require collective action, and that includes doing what we can to keep each other safe. But we are navigating new norms and a new normal. So we, accustomed to a world of judge-first-assess-later, need to embrace something else anew: empathy and understanding — from everyone.

      Source: www.cnn.com

      Author: Harmeet Kaur, CNN


      20 Black-Owned Foods And Beverages You Can Shop Online

      20 Black-Owned Foods And Beverages You Can Shop Online

      Launching a business in the food and beverage industry is rife with uncertainty. Businesses in the space often face a slim profit margin in their best years, and the unprecedented events of 2020 have presented challenges for which few entrepreneurs could have been prepared.

      The COVID-19 pandemic has left many businesses in need of support, but Black-owned businesses — often operating with less funding, investment and visibility than white-owned businesses — are in a particularly vulnerable position.

      The fight for equality and justice for all Black Americans requires support in many forms, from making donations to Black Lives Matter initiatives to showing solidarity on social media. Another way to show up is by supporting Black-owned businesses directly, and lists highlighting Black-owned restaurants have been published everywhere from Los Angeles to Syracuse. If you can’t get to one of those businesses right now, we’ve found some Black-owned food and beverage businesses that ship their goods nationwide.

      Ibraheem Basir began A Dozen Cousins as a way to honor the culinary influences of Black and Latino communities with a line of slow-cooked beans and legumes that include flavors like Cuban Black Beans and Trini Chickpea Curry.

      COVID-19 protection measures have created a demand for pantry products, posing a unique challenge for the young company, but Basir is hard at work delivering his high-quality products to the masses.

      “More people than ever have been looking for healthy products to stock their pantry and for simple dishes that they can prepare at home,” Basir told HuffPost. “Our products are a great fit for both of those needs, so we have been producing as much as we can to keep up with demand.”

      Iya Foods is a line of gluten-free flours, sauces and spices designed to help bring the flavors of West Africa to gluten-free cooking. Founder Toyin Kolawole sources many of the ingredients and spices in her products from Africa, and the products range from Cassava Waffle and Pancake Mix to seasoning for Jollof Rice and African Pepper Soup.

      Heritage Fare is a Cleveland-based family business that began selling sauces, seasonings and fish coatings in the 1990s. Popular products include the greens seasoning and the chicken wing sauces.

      Washington, D.C.-born entrepreneur Arsha Jones continues the sauce company she started in 2011 with her late husband Charles, bringing her city’s beloved signature Mambo Sauce to restaurants and homes around the country.

      It took Michelle Timberlake of Marjorie’s Beef Jerky six months to perfect her first beef jerky recipe. Her company, which she founded in 1991 and named after her mother, now includes flavors like Cracked Pepper, Orange Teriyaki and Hot and Spicy.

      The mother-daughter duo behind Popcorn Queens never had a storefront for their Columbia, Maryland, business, which actually may have helped them in recent weeks.

      “We always focused on shipping our gourmet caramel popcorn nationwide via our website,” April E. Wardlaw told HuffPost. “So, unlike many businesses, we did not have to completely shutdown when the pandemic hit.”

      They have lost income they would have earned attending local festivals and parties, but the entrepreneurs are more focused on what they can do in the fight for social justice for Black Americans.

      “Our hard work is starting to pay off and the orders are rolling in, so now the biggest challenge is that we are not able to get out there and protest in support of the Black Lives Matter Movement,” Wardlaw said. “Of course, being busy with orders is a good problem to have, but there’s been a few times in the last week where I’ve had to simply support in spirit as opposed to in-person the way I’d like.”

      Originating in the South Bronx, Sol Cacao is a collection of artisan, single-origin chocolate bars founded by the Maloney brothers. The bars are made from ethically sourced raw materials, and the brand is a tribute to the Maloney’s Trinidadian heritage.

      Sure, Zac Coughlin is a college student, but that doesn’t mean he can’t whip up sumptuous batches of truffles and chocolate-dipped cookies. Zac’s Sweet Shop, based in L.A., offers eight truffle flavors and 10 types of cookies. The brand is donating $1 to Black Lives Matter and Black Visions Collective for every dozen treats purchased.

      Cheesecake is just the beginning for this Charlotte, North Carolina-based dessert company. It ships its signature treat, as well as brownies, cakes, pies and cookies, to 25 states.

      Why stop at butter popcorn? Pops Kernel Gourmet Popcorn out of Memphis, Tennessee, has all sweet and savory cravings covered, with flavors including white cheddar ranch, caramel and even pineapple.

      Candy’s Sweets N Treats, Candace Aaron’s shop in Rock Hill, South Carolina, opened in March — just as coronavirus-related restrictions began to take effect. The shop has managed to gain a devoted following despite the pandemic, and Aaron plans to offer baking classes to children when it’s safe to do so.

      Cookie Society, which Marissa Allen founded in 2018 in Frisco, Texas, currently has 14 flavors of soft, chewy cookies, including Red Velvet, Brownie Nutella and Banana Pudding.

      Sweet treats without the guilt ― that’s the idea at the heart of Aquinnetta Mims’ dessert company, Healthy Addicts. Think dairy-free cookies made with almond flour and coconut sugar, plus brownies made with cassava flour.

      Jovon English is the mastermind behind L.A.-based Milk and Brookies, a cookie-brownie dessert hybrid that was once featured on “Shark Tank.”

      Genelle Drayton has found a winning recipe for artisanal macarons, and her signature CocoMallow sandwiches — marshmallow-filled coconut macarons — have made her Washington, D.C.-based company Sweet Dames a hit.

      Chef Phillip Ashley Rix has been dubbed the “Memphis King of Chocolate” for his line of seasonal, luxurious chocolates. Check his website frequently for designer chocolates inspired by cities like New Orleans and Seattle, and be sure to try the dark chocolate-covered bacon and signature caramels.

      Ellis Island Tea is a line of all-natural hibiscus teas inspired by tropical flavors found in Jamaica. Founder Nailah Ellis-Brown had been preparing for her Detroit-based business’ growth prior to COVID-19, and now she’s also committed to the well-being of her team as she sets her sights on the future.

      “Over the past week, the biggest challenge has been finding a way to deal with the weight of the racial and social tension that our community feels right now,” Ellis-Brown said. “Our staff, which is 100% Black, feels it. My children feel it. I feel it. Through it all, though, we’re still progressing.”

      Georgia-based Kemiko Lawrence, a mother of five, is on a mission to educate Black communities about the health benefits associated with kombucha. Kemboocha uses ingredients sourced from farms around Atlanta, and shoppers can buy one of four flavors or a kit to brew kombucha at home.

      The teas from Atlanta-based Just Add Honey are packed with high-quality ingredients and include flavors such as cacao rose, chocolate mint rooibos and a Georgia peached black tea.

      Red Bay Coffee is an Oakland-based company that produces dark- and medium-roast beans, as well as espresso. The brand celebrates Black culture, even in the names of the coffee: The Ethiopian medium roast is called “King’s Prize, while the blend from Guatemala and Burundi is “Carver’s Dream.” Founder Keba Konte is committed to using his company to provide employment opportunities to students, people who were formerly incarcerated, and members of the local community.

      10 Fashion and Beauty Items To Buy From Black Owned Brands Right Now

      Source: www.huffpost.com

      Author: Shontel HorneOn Assignment For HuffPost


      5 Remote Work Lessons, From The Person Grooming Billion Dollar People

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