4 tips for college students to avoid procrastinating with their online work

4 tips for college students to avoid procrastinating with their online work

Time management and supportive learning environments are keys to avoiding procrastination. fizkes/ iStock via Getty Images Plus Kui Xie, The Ohio State University and Sheng-Lun Cheng, Sam Houston State University If you take classes online, chances are you probably procrastinate from time to time. Research shows that more than 70% of college students procrastinate, with […] Govt Jobs in Punjab 2020: Get Free notification of all Punjab Government Jobs November 2020 and its Job vacancies across sectors in Punjab like Railways, Banking Employment in Punjab, Universities, College Govt Jobs, Teaching, Schools in Punjab Financial Institutions 2020, Defence, UPSC, SSC, Agriculture and many more Punjab Government Jobs. Date: 2020-10-22 12:56:28🔎 Now hiring work-from-home jobs! No experience required online jobs in customer service roles. Work-at-home and get paid training and great benefits! Great remote career opportunity. Watch the full video for details, then By Breanna Palzer | Published by November 19, 2020 Many students feel that too much work and not having any stability is affecting their college experience. Some are also worried about future semesters and their financial situation. “I’ve been having such a hard time trying to find a job,” senior, marketing major, Ashley Aucapina said. “I don’t really want to […] 2020 Fall Live Online Continuing Education Trainings  Fatherhood Engagement and Social Connections Date: November 19, 2020 Time: 9:00AM-4:00PM This article addresses some of the best practices that employers who elect to test employees’ temperatures due to the coronavirus pandemic can use to protect employees’ health and safety and to minimize their legal risks.

Kui Xie, The Ohio State University and Sheng-Lun Cheng, Sam Houston State University

If you take classes online, chances are you probably procrastinate from time to time.

Research shows that more than 70% of college students procrastinate, with about 20% consistently doing it all the time.

Procrastination is putting off starting or finishing a task despite knowing that it will seriously compromise the quality of your work – for instance, putting off a major class project until the last minute.

In fact, research has shown that procrastination can be a harmful behavior that lowers a student’s grades.

Now that so many colleges and universities are operating remotely because of the COVID-19 pandemic, we worry that students are more prone to procrastinate because they have less access to campus facilities and structured support from instructors. We raise these concerns as researchers who study students’ motivation and engagement and their procrastination in online learning.

As professors, we’ve also heard our fair share of explanations and excuses for why students missed deadlines. Everything from “my computer doesn’t work” to “my Wi-Fi went dead.” We even had one student claim that “Grandma died” in one course and that “Grandpa died” in another course. We also have had students claim that their roommate deleted their homework.

Whether you see those reasons as valid or not, none of them really gets at why students procrastinate and end up in those kinds of situations in the first place. With that in mind, here are four tips that can help students deal better with the root causes of procrastination when it comes to online coursework.

One of the main reasons students procrastinate is that they do not see their coursework as relevant to what they’re doing now or expect to do later on. When students find that their academic tasks are interesting, important and useful, they are more likely to try harder to get them done and less likely to put them off.

Remote learning can make students feel bored and frustrated. Therefore, finding ways to stay motivated can prevent procrastination.

Remind yourself of the practical value of your academic tasks. Figure out the reasons you’re studying something in the first place.

For instance, instead of viewing the completion of an assignment as a way to fulfill course requirements, you can think about how to turn your coursework into something related to your life or career goals. For a computer science student, a programming assignment could be made a part of your portfolio to help secure an internship or even a job – as some of our own students have done. A research report could be turned into an academic journal article to enhance your profile when applying for graduate school in the future.

College life can get hectic. Many college students must juggle coursework, social events and work commitments at the same time. Getting more organized helps stave off procrastination. This means breaking long-term goals into smaller short-term, challenging and clear goals and tasks.

The reason this technique works is that procrastination is directly related to an individual’s preference and desire for working on a task. When a goal is too large, it becomes not immediately achievable; therefore, you will see this task as less desirable and be more likely to put it off.

By breaking a large long-term goal into a series of smaller and more concrete subgoals, you will see the project as easier to complete and, more importantly, your perceived distance to the finishing line will shorten. This way, you are more likely to perceive the project as desirable, and you will be less likely to procrastinate.

Second, you need to plan your time daily by listing tasks based on their importance and urgency, estimating how much time you need to complete each task, and identifying concrete steps to reach daily goals. That is, tell yourself that in the context of X, I will need to do Y to accomplish Z.

It is also important to plan your time according to how and when you prefer to study. For example, you may concentrate the most late at night, your memory may work the best in the early mornings, or you may collaborate better during the day.

In addition, you should use tech tools, such as calendar and task-management apps, to plan your time and monitor how much you’re getting done.

Another important way to avoid procrastination is to make sure that your learning environment is supportive for learning.

During the coronavirus pandemic, students are usually learning from home, but sometimes they study wherever they happen to be, even at picnic tables in public parks. These places may not be best suited for academic activities.

These environments have many characteristics that may be more interesting and less emotionally draining than academic tasks. Therefore, students could drift away from academic tasks and wind up instead chatting with friends or watching sports. This is why choosing or creating a good place to study can help people stop procrastinating.

Try to set up your surroundings in a way that suits your learning habits, including where you put tables and chairs and how you use lighting and block out noises. For example, some students may enjoy learning in a quiet and dark space with a spotlight. Others may learn best when they use a standing desk next to a bright window and constantly play soft background music.

Friends and classmates can help one another stop procrastinating. Colleagues and other contacts can hold one another accountable and help one another meet deadlines. This is particularly important for anyone who struggles with self-control. Research also has shown that having supportive friends and other peers can boost self-confidence and make tasks seem more valuable and interesting.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, students are physically isolated from most of their friends and classmates. The social support that students normally receive in face-to-face settings, such as after-class chats and study groups, has also been moved to virtual spaces. That is, it’s still available, but mainly through virtual means, such as instant-messaging apps, online collaboration tools or video conferencing software. Used wisely, these tools can help students work with friends to overcome procrastination and make the classwork more enjoyable.The Conversation

Kui Xie, Cyphert Distinguished Professor; Professor of Learning Technologies; Director of The Research Laboratory for Digital Learning, The Ohio State University and Sheng-Lun Cheng, Assistant Professor of Instructional Systems Design and Technology, Sam Houston State University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Source: dl.ehe.osu.edu

Author: Kui Xie


Govt Jobs in Punjab 2020. Apply Vacancies ਪੰਜਾਬ ਸਰਕਾਰ ਦੀਆਂ ਨੌਕਰੀਆਂ

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Students are complaining online is too much work

Students are complaining online is too much work

By Breanna Palzer | Published by November 19, 2020

Many students feel that too much work and not having any stability is affecting their college experience. Some are also worried about future semesters and their financial situation.

“I’ve been having such a hard time trying to find a job,” senior, marketing major, Ashley Aucapina said. “I don’t really want to have a job where I risk my health but it seems like that’s all that’s being offered right now.”

Students are searching for online jobs but those positions are becoming increasingly harder to find, leaving them without jobs and income. Students who live in dormitories have not been able to see their families for extended periods of time because Kean is asking students not to leave the campus unless it is necessary.

Photo by Breanna Palzer Online class taking place.

Photo by Breanna Palzer
Online class taking place.

The Spring 2021 semester won’t be the same as a recent email sent out by President Lamont Repollet stated that Kean cancelled their spring in an effort to limit students going home and possibly contracting the virus.

“It makes sense to be honest,” Communications major, Ashley Winrow said, “I know people are going to want to go to parties and all that, so it’s a sacrifice we are going to have to make so that we all don’t get sick”

Another problem is the amount of work professors are giving during the remote learning experience. Several students said their instructors seem to be giving more work and much of it is unnecessary.

Students have been in an uproar, and even started a petition on change.org, to get their workload lessened. The petition has over 2,300 signatures and so far nothing has been done about it.  Many students have said it’s the weekly discussion board questions and the required responses on the online Blackboard system that seems to be the least necessary part of their learning experience.

“I’ve had so much work due over the past two weeks,” communications major Aiden Gerrard said, “I’ve had two presentations, two research papers, and one regular paper. I also have to do those discussion questions as well, which just seems like a waste of time.”

Source: kutower.com


Current Trainings | School of Social Work

Current Trainings | School of Social Work

woman speaking into a microphone

Date: November 19, 2020

Time: 9:00AM-4:00PM

CEU’s: 6.0

  • Explore Internal (personal) and External (societal) views of the importance of fatherhood
  • Discuss mothers as gatekeepers and provide engagement strategies
  • Discuss the importance of a father’s role in the journey for permanency
  • Examine how fatherlessness impacts the community
  • Look at how systems engage fathers
  • Discuss the benefits of father involvement
  • Discuss strategies on how to engage fathers
  • Discuss how to provide hope to fathers who may be struggling
  • Provide fathers with information and resources
  • Trainers: 

    Marcus Stallworth, MSW, is the Director of Learning and Organizational Development at Welcome 2 Reality. He is an author of a journal article published in the 23rd volume of Child Welfare League of America?s Children?s Voice. Marcus is a national consultant and trainer for Child Welfare League of America and professor at the University of Bridgeport and Post University

    Qur-an Webb, MSW, is the Director of Operations at Welcome 2 Reality. He is a wealth knowledge and experience in Child Welfare. Qur-an an independent contractor and graduate of the Elm City Fellowship for Children and Families sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Qur-an teaches at the University of Bridgeport.

    Registration Link: https://apm.activecommunities.com/pittsocialwork/Activity_Search/4079​

    Date: December 4, 2020

    Time: 3:00PM-5:00PM

    CEU’s: 2.0

  • Participants will be able to describe emotion regulation and emotion dysregulation
  • Participants will be able to identify the impact of dysregulated emotions on relationships with themselves and others.
  • Participants will be able to identify strategies to manage emotional distress.
  • Understand the impact of messages received from family of origin on emotional development
  • Understand the emotions experienced
  • Decrease negative vulnerability and increase acceptance of emotions
  • Identify and implement trauma informed approaches for regulating intense emotions.
  • Trainer: 

    Sharise Nance LCSW, CCTP (also known as the Compassion Fatigue lady) is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Certified Clinical Trauma Professional, Compassion Fatigue Specialist, Adjunct Professor, Award Winning Entrepreneur and Author. She is the co-owner and founder of HandinHand Counseling Services LLC and has over 20 years of experience assisting individuals, couples and families see beyond energy depletion, hopelessness, panic, guilt and feeling overwhelmed and assists them in making a shift to a place of peace, joy, clarity and gratification. Sharise also dedicates her efforts to running Vitamin C Healing, an organization designed to promote life balance, satisfaction and fulfillment among those throughout the helping profession and beyond.

    With considerable experience speaking at keynotes, workshops, and seminars for young professionals, helping professionals, caregivers, entrepreneurs, women, parents, and adolescents across the country; she strives to equip individuals with the tools to prevent compassion fatigue and burnout in order to live happy, fulfilled lives and careers. With her depth of experience from nearly two decades working with a diverse population of people from all walks of life, Sharise is eager to share all that she’s learned. Most recently, Sharise created the S.W.A.G. Awards: Social Worker Appreciation of Greatness Awards, to honor the “heart work” of local social workers in the Greater Pittsburgh area who often go unappreciated and unrecognized.She resides in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with her husband William Nance. More information on Sharise can be found by visiting www.vitaminchealing.com

    Registration Link: https://apm.activecommunities.com/pittsocialwork/Activity_Search/4083

    Date: December 8, 2020

    Time: 1:00PM-4:00PM

    CEU’s: 3.0

  • Critical thinking
  • Self-awareness
  • Working through Resistance
  • Explain the importance of identifying and establishing Kin/Fictive Kin placements to promote wellbeing in children
  • Trainers: 

    Marcus Stallworth, MSW, is the Director of Learning and Organizational Development at Welcome 2 Reality. He is an author of a journal article published in the 23rd volume of Child Welfare League of America?s Children?s Voice. Marcus is a national consultant and trainer for Child Welfare League of America and professor at the University of Bridgeport and Post University

    Qur-an Webb, MSW, is the Director of Operations at Welcome 2 Reality. He is a wealth knowledge and experience in Child Welfare. Qur-an an independent contractor and graduate of the Elm City Fellowship for Children and Families sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Qur-an teaches at the University of Bridgeport.

    Registration Link: https://apm.activecommunities.com/pittsocialwork/Activity_Search/4080

    Date: December 19, 2020

    Time: 9:00AM-12:00PM

    CEU’s: 3.0

    Course Description

    While most social workers believe that they practice ethically, many are not familiar with general ethical principles which impact everyday social work practice.  Still others have not reviewed the Code of Ethics since its update in 2018.  How can you know that you practice ethically when you remain generally uniformed?  Even for those who consider themselves ethically competent, new models of service provision presented by the current public health crisis offer ethical challenges for all.  This workshop helps participants translate ethical concepts into everyday practical application. 

    Learning Objectives 

  • Fundamental ethical principles and social work values commonly applied to social work professional practice 
  • Understand how ethical principles found in the NASW Code of Ethics impact everyday practice                                          
  • Review emerging and timely issues which impact ethical practice in the workplace
  • Trainer: 

    Ginny Vayda, LCSW, BCD, is a well-known speaker and workshop presenter locally, statewide, and nationally. She has presented on a wide variety of subjects spanning topics from social work productivity, competency based staff development to social health determinants, social work safety and ethics. She has been part of the adjunct social work faculty at the University of Pittsburgh and several other Pennsylvania universities. For the past 18 years she has been an NASW trainer in Pennsylvania for the social work licensure preparatory class. Currently Ginny is the Social Work Executive at a VA Medical Center in Pennsylvania where she oversees the professional practice of more than 60 licensed social workers.

    Registration Link: https://apm.activecommunities.com/pittsocialwork/Activity_Search/4081

    Assessment of Dementia Through the Use of Evidence-Based Measures focuses upon assessment and differential diagnosis.  Emphasis will be on explaining how to use screening tools and to differentiate various types of dementia.  Participants will be asked to think about how to incorporate these tools into mental status examination and community practice.  The information will be useful for other health care providers as they interact with primary care and help persons who have ADRD or their families navigate the health system.

    Pharmacologic Interventions for Dementia Syndromes will explore interventions with an emphasis on using the published literature to choose pharmacological interventions for cognitive and behavioral manifestations of dementia, including the roles (i.e., indications and benefits), cautions (i.e., risks, side-effects, warnings) and potential alternatives to using cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, antipsychotics, and antidepressants in ADRD.  Finally, given the recent FDA approval of 3 amyloid imaging agents, this program will also help participants better understand how biomarkers are changing practices with regard to clinical research and management of ADRD.

    Source: www.socialwork.pitt.edu


    Best Practices When Implementing a Program for Taking Employee Temperatures During the COVID-19 Pandemic | Foley & Lardner LLP

    Best Practices When Implementing a Program for Taking Employee Temperatures During the COVID-19 Pandemic | Foley & Lardner LLP

    Businesses that remain operational during the COVID-19 pandemic are faced with the challenge of determining what they can do to minimize the risk of spreading the virus while still being able to provide critical products and services to our communities.  Many of these essential employers have started screening employees’ temperatures in an effort to ensure that employees with symptoms of the illness do not infect their coworkers.

    This article addresses some of the best practices that employers who elect to test employees’ temperatures can use to protect employees’ health and safety and to minimize their legal risks.

    In ordinary times, the Americans with Disabilities Act narrowly limits the circumstances under which employers can require medical examinations of employees – which includes temperature screening.  Consistent with EEOC Guidance, employers could only take an employee’s temperature if doing so was “job-related and consistent with business necessity.”

    But what constitutes business necessity is different during a pandemic.  Not surprisingly, given the scope and severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission – the agency tasked with enforcing the ADA – has stated that temperature checks during this time are valid and appropriate.

    Nevertheless, for employers pursuing this practice, it is important they take steps to ensure that they are considering several different issues and complying with all applicable legal rules.

    Best Practice: For employers with a trained nurse or medical professional on-site, the trained personnel should be taking temperatures and/or training non-medical personnel to do so.  In the event the nurse or medical professional is providing training to others, the training should be documented in writing.

    For employers that do not have a trained nurse or medical professional on-site, the employer should designate one or more management-level personnel to conduct the testing.  This individual should review the directions to use the thermometer or scanning equipment to ensure proper use.  That individual should also be trained to follow up in the event of an error or a result that is inconsistent with common sense (i.e., a reading that is much too low or too high).  The training process should be documented.

    These questions are intertwined.  Best Practice: is to use equipment that requires no direct contact between the temperature taker and the employees.  Scanners that can measure temperature remotely are ideal.  Forehead scanners also minimize the amount of contact.  If you have issues sourcing these types of thermometers, oral or other types of thermometers are a reasonable substitute.  In the latter case, make sure to clean the thermometers thoroughly between each employee, so as to not spread infection.  Read and following the directions for cleaning that accompany the thermometer.  If no directions are available, rinse the tip of the thermometer in cold water, clean it with alcohol or alcohol swabs, and then rinse it again before next use.

    If you are using a temperature measurement that requires contact between the temperature taker and the employees, the taker should be equipped with adequate personal protective equipment to ensure safety for both parties.  The taker should be provided with gloves, goggles, face masks, and gowns.  If the taker is not using a “touchless” system, he or she should change gloves with each scan.

    The temperature taker is not the only one for whom best practices should be considered with a temperature-taking process; employers should be cognizant of the various states’ and municipalities’ social distancing requirements for the employees awaiting to have their temperatures checked as well. 

    Best Practices:  

  • Consider whether additional shifts can be established to reduce the number of employees in the worksite at one time
  • Stagger shift start- and end-times greater than normal when possible (while still ensuring safe operations), to eliminate employees from congregating during the shift change-over, and from over-crowding at entrances and exits
  • Have multiple such lines and entrances if possible to reduce crowding
  • Consider placing markings (whether in tape or otherwise) on the ground in the corridor to demarcate six (6)-foot lengths to provide for greater social distancing by employees while in line
  • Whether employees must be compensated for time spent having their temperature taken (and waiting in line to do so) is likely to be a contested issue in the coming months.  To the extent that any legal authority requires a temperature test before an employee is allowed to work, it is likely that time spent undertaking such a test will be compensable.  However, even if such a test is not required, both good employee relations and state law requirements may counsel in favor of paying employees for this time.

    Note also that the FLSA generally prohibits pausing compensable time once an employee’s work day starts (aside from an unpaid lunch period).  Thus, if the employee’s compensable time begins with the temperature check (or waiting in line), all subsequent pre-shift activities will likely be compensable, as well.  By implementing the Best Practices outlined above regarding staggered shifts, this should also reduce the amount of time spent by employees passing thru a temperature-checking process.  

    The CDC states that a fever for COVID-19 purposes is any temperature at 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit/38 degrees Celsius or higher.  However, ensure that you also consult state and local guidelines regarding temperature levels.  Certain state and local governments and agencies have set their own, more restrictive (and some less restrictive) thresholds for what constitutes a fever.  Of course, such guidelines should dictate whether employers disqualify an employee from entering the work site.

    Discreetly notify the employee that he or she has a fever and do not allow him or her to enter the work environment.  The employee should begin quarantine procedures, and should not return to work for 14 days, and only if by that point, the employee has been fever-free for three (3) days and is otherwise symptom-free as well.

    While employers are permitted to take temperatures during this pandemic, if the temperature of employees are “recorded,” that information must be maintained confidentially under the ADA and only provided to those who should have knowledge of the information.  Employers can also consider simply recording “no” (meaning the employee’s temperature is under the appropriate threshold) or “yes” (meaning the employee has a fever at 100.4 degrees or above) for each employee, instead of recording each individual employee’s specific temperature on any given work day.  Regardless, the information that is recorded should be treated as a confidential medical document and not placed in any employee’s personnel file.  

    Finally, note that taking employee temperatures and screening employees for fevers is not a silver bullet against the spread of COVID-19.  There is still so much that the medical community does not know about COVID-19 and its spread.  Current medical information suggests that individuals without any symptoms (i.e., asymptomatic) may nevertheless be infected with COVID-19 and still transmit the virus to others. 

    For this reason, taking temperatures does not eliminate the need to practice to maintain other steps to avoid the spread of the virus:  maintaining social distancing best practices, including promoting remote work as much as possible; maintaining adequate distances between employees who are in the workplace; frequent hand washing and disinfecting; and, frequent cleaning and disinfecting of common areas and touch-points throughout the workplace.

    Foley has created a multi-disciplinary and multi-jurisdictional team, which has prepared a wealth of topical client resources and is prepared to help our clients meet the legal and business challenges that the coronavirus outbreak is creating for stakeholders across a range of industries. Click here for Foley’s Coronavirus Resource Center to stay apprised of relevant developments, insights and resources to support your business during this challenging time. To receive this content directly in your inbox, click here and submit the form. 

    Source: www.foley.com


    4 tips for college students to avoid procrastinating with their online work


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