11 Creative Charity Fundraising Event Ideas

11 Creative Charity Fundraising Event Ideas

There’s no time like the present to get started planning your next event. Here are some of my favorite creative charity event ideas. National Council webinars present experts on key topics in mental health and addictions, followed by meaningful Q&A. Experience advantages of online learning as you earn your accredited high school diploma at JMHS. Read the benefits of online high school and enroll today! Many fundraising events have been canceled this year, so here are our top tips to organizing a virtual walk or race to fundraise for your cause! Visit dell.com to browse a variety of Dell and Alienware gaming monitors of various sizes. Shop now to get free shipping.

Since 2012, thousands of nonprofits have run campaigns on CauseVox’s fundraising platform. Some of these campaigns have been more traditional—such as an online peer-to-peer fundraising campaign, while others break the mold.

And while there’s nothing wrong with your standard fundraiser, sometimes it’s fun to do something a bit different. That’s why you should try incorporating more events into your charity’s annual fundraising plan.

Charity events don’t just raise money for your charity, they also help to engage your supporters and bring publicity to your cause. Plus, speaking as a fundraising professional, I know how nice it is to do something new and different every once in a while.

There’s no time like the present to get started planning your next event. Here are some of my favorite creative charity event ideas.

charity event idea

I’m not one to jump out of a plane for fun, but I know plenty of people who have skydiving on their bucket list. Whether you’re a sky-jumping pro or a novice, one thing’s for sure, you’re bound to remember every single jump.

Yes, people will jump out of a plane for your cause! Why? Partly because they love what you do, and partly because some just love all that adrenaline.

Most communities have a skydiving outfit that’ll be willing to work with you to plan the event. To help fund the dives, encourage your jumpers to create personal fundraising webpages online using CauseVox’s peer-to-peer fundraising software.

charity event idea

If you’re on a fixed budget or timeframe, a one-day online fundraiser is one of the best charity event ideas for your organization.

First, choose a day that means something to your organization or those you help. For example, The Adventure Project planned a one-day fundraiser to fund a well water mechanics program in India. To promote urgency and need, the campaign occurred on World Water Day.

Once you’ve selected a date, create a campaign theme and get started putting your website together. Don’t wait until the day of the event to promote it. Instead, let your donors know ahead of time about the campaign so they have time to prepare and/or help spread the word.

charity event idea

Using Facebook Live is one of the most affordable and creative charity event ideas. As always, let your supporters know ahead of time the day, time, and any pertinent fundraiser details such as any guest speakers, goals, and topics of discussion.

Also, encourage your supporters to connect with you on Facebook if they haven’t already.

Once you go “Live,” your followers will get a push notification. From there, they can comment, write in their intended pledge and “Like” your feed. Just don’t forget to include a link to your donation page in your description so you can capture those donations.

charity event idea

While it may seem like every charity is organizing a running road race such as a 5k or marathon, you’re right. And these events are extremely popular because they have the potential to bring in some serious income for your charity.

We’ve seen hundreds of organizations plan 5ks and marathons using our platform. For example, Get REAL encouraged runners to raise $150 as part of the “Running for Love 5k.” Likewise, Global Kids, Inc. also asked participants to raise money with CauseVox’s peer-to-peer fundraising platform.

Sweat for STF from She’s the First on Vimeo.

If time is of the essence and/or you lack the resources to manage an entire road race, there’s still a way to encourage people to get moving for your cause. A personal fitness challenge is something anyone of your supporters can do to raise money.

Encourage participants to choose a race or challenge they’d like to complete (anything from a self-chosen 5k to swimming 5 miles and everything in between). Then, they’ll set up a personal fundraising page and encourage people to give to fund the activity.

One of the best features of a personal fitness challenge is that it can occur on your supporter’s own schedule. In 2013, She’s The First ran an ongoing personal fitness challenge fundraiser called “Run the World.” With this fundraiser, She’s The First engaged hundreds of donors and raised over $40,000.

charity event idea

When the weather starts to warm up and the summer wardrobe is pushed to the center of your closet, you know that spring is right around the corner. And one thing’s for sure, many of your largest supporters want nothing more than to spend a morning on the golf course.

Golf tournaments are a great deal of fun for participants. If you think your supporters will be interested in this type of event, work with a local golf course on pricing and dates (hint: most are very comfortable working with charities to run tournaments). Leave yourself plenty of time to get teams together and market the event.

Ask local businesses to sponsor a team, or get people to fundraise to fund their participation like The First Tee of Greater St. Louis. Oh, and don’t forget to look into “hole-in-one” insurance if you plan to give a prize for this accomplishment!

charity event idea

Is there a local celebrity, well-known personality, or local expert in your community that believes in your cause and can speak to it? If so, plan a guest speaker event.

Invite the community by advertising on social media, print media, email, and direct mail. Encourage your own supporters to share the event with their friends and family. Charge a flat entry fee or suggested donation for attendees.

This doesn’t have to be an elaborate night event with food and drinks (although that is definitely an option). For a low-key event, make it a lunch and learn.

charity event idea

Leverage your donor’s donation with a match. This is a simple, efficient, and enticing creative charity event idea to encourage people to give.

To start, check Double The Donation’s website for a list of some of the largest gift matching companies.

Or, do the work yourself. Talk with major donors and local businesses that may be able to match donor dollars during a specific time frame or possibly even the entire campaign. An anonymous donor is doing just that for Just 1’s 20 for 40 campaign.

charity event idea

We’ve already discussed a personal fitness challenge, but there are other challenges your supporters can perform to raise money for your charity, and they’re one of the most effective creative charity event ideas.

Personal challenges can range from growing facial hair (or removing it) to symbolic gestures like living off of $2 day or avoiding electronics for 24-hours.

If there’s something your supporters can do to both bring awareness to your cause and help you raise money, then promote it! For inspiration, check out the David Lichman Moustache Challenge. This brave man pledged to remove his 30-year old moustache to support 2 organization, Operation Second Chance and One Step Closer.

charity event idea

There are a number of things many families purchase during the holidays, including wreaths, Christmas trees, wrapping paper, candles, and poinsettias. Sure, folks can get all these things and more at the store, but I’m sure they’ll be more willing to buy them from your charity if it’s for your good cause.

Check to see what other organizations are doing before you choose your fundraiser. Then, work with a wholesaler to get the items at-cost and sell them for a slight profit. It’s a win-win for everyone!

charity event idea

Your town is filled with people who need services done, whether it’s snow removal or fall leaf cleanup. This is where your charity comes into play.

Choose the “chore” you’d like to provide your community, advertise , gather volunteers, and get to work. Ask those calling on your charity to give a donation in exchange for your services.

We realize that you’re working tirelessly to raise money for your charity. While there are thousands of creative charity event ideas out there-you’ll find one that excites and engages your supporters.

Try one of these 11 creative charity event ideas this upcoming year, and let us know how it goes!

Additional creative charity event ideas can be found on our list of 101+ Fundraising Ideas for Nonprofits & Charities Proven To Work.

To use CauseVox to power your charity event, check out our guide How To Plan A Nonprofit Crowdfunding Campaign.

Source: www.causevox.com


Webinars

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    CoE Office Hours: COVID-19 Scalable Solutions – Strengthening Community Based Partnerships

    To support individuals who face tremendous barriers to integrated healthcare services during the ongoing pandemic, including those with serious mental illness, several provider organizations have formed partnerships  to creatively bridge service gaps in their communities.

    Join the Center of Excellence for Integrated Health Solutions on Tuesday, Nov. 17, from 3 p.m. ET to 4 p.m. ET to hear about best practices and lessons learned in establishing innovative partnerships and pathways regarding:

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    This session is part of a year-long virtual series called “Solving for Sleep” which is focused on addressing sleep and related social and health needs through enhancing integrated primary and behavioral health care. This series is offered by the Primary Care Development Corporation (PCDC) and the SAMHSA Center of Excellence for Integrated Health Solutions.

    Compassion Fatigue and Resilience: Strategies for School Based Health Center Providers

    The on-going COVID-19 pandemic has taken an immense toll on School-Based Health Centers and entire school communities, which includes behavioral health providers, educators, staff, students, and families. While behavioral health providers and staff are particularly at risk for compassion fatigue, they are also in a unique position to enhance resilience among themselves and within their school communities during the pandemic, by using trauma-informed care approaches. Join us for this two-part webinar series that will explore trauma-informed care concepts and strategies first for providers and professionals, and then among students and families within school communities.

    Join us for our first webinar of this two-part series titled, Compassion Fatigue and Resilience: Strategies for School Based Health Center Providers, on Thursday, December 10th, from 2:00pm – 3:00pm ET. This webinar will provide an overview of the impact of trauma on individuals within school communities and explore the concept of compassion fatigue and strategies for building resilience among behavioral health providers and staff in school community settings.

    Tips and Tools for Leveraging Trauma Informed Care Techniques to Reduce Stress for Students, Teachers, and Providers

    The on-going COVID-19 pandemic has taken an immense toll on School-Based Health Centers and entire school communities, which includes behavioral health providers, educators, staff, students, and families. While behavioral health providers and staff are particularly at risk for compassion fatigue, they are also in a unique position to enhance resilience among themselves and within their school communities during the pandemic, by using trauma-informed care approaches. Join us for this two-part webinar series that will explore trauma-informed care concepts and strategies first for providers and professionals, and then among students and families within school communities.

    Join us for our second webinar in this two-part series titled, Tips and Tools for Leveraging Trauma Informed Care Techniques to Reduce Stress for Students, Teachers, and Providers, on Tuesday, December 15h, from 2:00pm – 3:00pm ET. This webinar will explore trauma-informed care techniques that behavioral health providers, school staff, and caregivers can use to improve behavioral healthcare provided to students, and address traumatic stress occurring during the on-going pandemic.

    Solving for Sleep: Unseen Impacts: Health Disparities and Sleep

    This session will explore the impact and relationship of sleep and disparities related to key determinants including housing, income and employment, and race.

    This session is part of a year-long virtual series called “Solving for Sleep” which is focused on addressing sleep and related social and health needs through enhancing integrated primary and behavioral health care. This series is offered by the Primary Care Development Corporation (PCDC) and the SAMHSA Center of Excellence for Integrated Health Solutions.

    Solving for Sleep: Behavioral Health Lens on Sleep: Assessment and Intervention

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    This session is part of a year-long virtual series called “Solving for Sleep” which is focused on addressing sleep and related social and health needs through enhancing integrated primary and behavioral health care. This series is offered by the Primary Care Development Corporation (PCDC) and the SAMHSA Center of Excellence for Integrated Health Solutions.

    Solving for Sleep: One Good Night: Experiences of Insomnia for Patients and Families Across the Lifespan

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    Academic publishing - Wikipedia

    Academic publishing – Wikipedia

    List of academic fields

  • Applied sciences
  • Formal sciences
  • Humanities
  • Natural sciences
  • Professions
  • Social sciences
  • Research design

  • Research proposal
  • Research question
  • Argument
  • Referencing
  • Philosophy

  • Constructivism
  • Empiricism
  • Positivism / Antipositivism / Postpositivism
  • Critical realism
  • Subtle realism
  • Research strategy

  • Interdisciplinary
  • Multimethodology
  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Methodology

  • Action research
  • Art methodology
  • Critical theory
  • Feminism
  • Grounded theory
  • Hermeneutics
  • Historiography
  • Narrative inquiry
  • Phenomenology
  • Pragmatism
  • Scientific method
  • Methods

  • Case study
  • Content analysis
  • Descriptive statistics
  • Discourse analysis
  • Ethnography
  • Field experiment
  • Quasi-experiment
  • Field research
  • Historical method
  • Inferential statistics
  • Interviews
    • Cultural mapping
  • Phenomenography
  • Bibliometrics
  • Literature review
  • Meta-analysis
  • Scoping review
  • Systematic review
    • Simulation
  • Survey
    • v
    • t
    • e

    Scientific and technical journal publications per million residents (2013)

  • Concept Paper:[29][30]
  • Research paper
  • Case report or Case series
  • Position paper
  • Review article or Survey paper
  • Species paper
  • Technical paper
  • Perhaps the most widely recognized failing of peer review is its inability to ensure the identification of high-quality work. The list of important scientific papers that were initially rejected by peer-reviewed journals goes back at least as far as the editor of Philosophical Transaction’s 1796 rejection of Edward Jenner’s report of the first vaccination against smallpox.[32]

  • Single-blind peer review
  • Double-blind peer review
  • Open peer review
  • Potential readership of Open Access material is far greater than that for publications where the full-text is restricted to subscribers.
  • Details of contents can be read by specialised web harvesters.
  • Details of contents also appear in normal search engines like Google, Google Scholar, Yahoo, etc.
    • S. M. J. Mortazavi, and Z. Hashemi (June 2011). “Tiger or Rabbit does not Matter: a New Look into the Recent Great Achievements of Iranian Scientists”. Indian Journal of Science and Technology. 4 (6): 716. doi:10.17485/ijst/2011/v4i6.21. Archived from the original on 2014-01-10.
  • Belcher, Wendy Laura. “Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks: A Guide to Academic Publishing Success.” ISBN 9781412957014
  • Best, Joel. “Following the Money Across the Landscape of Sociology Journals.” The American Sociologist (2015): 1-16.
  • Brienza, Casey (2012). “Opening the wrong gate? The academic spring and scholarly publishing in the humanities and social sciences”. Publishing Research Quarterly. 28 (3): 159–171. doi:10.1007/s12109-012-9272-5. S2CID 144975300.
  • Culler, Jonathan, and Kevin Lamb. Just being difficult? : academic writing in the public arena Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2003. ISBN 0-8047-4709-1
  • Germano, William. Getting It Published, 2nd Edition: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious About Serious Books. ISBN 978-0-226-28853-6. Read a chapter.
  • Greco, Albert N (2015). “Academic Libraries and the Economics of Scholarly Publishing in the Twenty-First Century: Portfolio Theory, Product Differentiation, Economic Rent, Perfect Price Discrimination, and the Cost of Prestige”. Journal of Scholarly Publishing. 47 (1): 1–43. doi:10.3138/jsp.47.1.01. S2CID 145144718.
  • Nelson, Cary and Stephen Watt. “Scholarly Books” and “Peer Review” in Academic Keywords: A Devil’s Dictionary for Higher Education. ISBN 0-415-92203-8.
  • Tenopir, Carol and Donald King. “Towards Electronic Journals: Realities for Librarians and Publishers. SLA, 2000. ISBN 0-87111-507-7.
  • Wellington, J. J. Getting published : a guide for lecturers and researcher (RoutledgeFalmer, 2003). ISBN 0-415-29847-4
  • Yang, Rui. “Scholarly publishing, knowledge mobility and internationalization of Chinese universities.” in Tara Fenwick and Lesley Farrell, eds. Knowledge mobilization and educational research: Politics, languages and responsibilities (2012): 185–167.
    • Journal of Scholarly Publishing

    Source: en.wikipedia.org

    Author: Authority control
    LCCN: sh85118235


    Advantages of Online Learning - Online High School Benefits

    Advantages of Online Learning – Online High School Benefits

    You may already have a sense for the many advantages of online learning. Online learning at JMHS makes it possible for anyone, no matter where or how you live, to earn a high school diploma. We are among the most flexible, most affordable, online accredited high schools.

    Accessibility – You may enroll year-round. All courses use eBooks or Internet content that’s online and available for access 24/7 from your own computer or mobile device.

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    How To Organize A Virtual Walkathon Or Race

    How To Organize A Virtual Walkathon Or Race

    The Coronavirus pandemic has caused a massive disruption to not-for-profit organizations, and in particular to event fundraising.

    Many physical events have been canceled but in response to this there has been a surge of growth in virtual events – from exercises classes, marathons and races to concerts and galas, 2020 is the year of the virtual event!

    So if you had an event planned for the next few months, or if you’re looking for a way to fundraise right now, we suggest organizing a virtual event to do so. It can be a great, low-barrier way to engage your community and raise some much needed funds.

    A virtual walkathon or race is, at its heart, a peer-to-peer fundraiser. Participants raise money from their friends and family to complete a challenge.

    A virtual race can be based on any type of exercise. It is usually walking or running but you could also think about cycling, swimming or a particular exercise that is more suited to your audience.

    Let’s say you’ve chosen walking. As a peer to peer event, participants can sign-up and commit to a number of kms that they will walk in a certain time frame. This could be 5kms over 24 hours, 15kms over 2 weeks, or 55kms over 4 weeks – you can choose the timeframe and challenge, or let participants choose for themselves.

    Participants would then be expected to raise funds from their friends and family via their own fundraising pages.

    While we are in the midst of a crisis, it does not mean that fundraising should stop. In fact, many charities are finding that people are continuing to donate and so we highly recommend pivoting your fundraising strategies to find creative ways, such as virtual events, to keep your fundraising going.

    There are many reasons why a virtual walk or race works as a fundraising event right now, and in the future. Here’s just some of them:

    • One of the advantages of having a virtual event means reduced costs on things such as a venue and insurance. If your charity was thinking of tipping its toe into the event fundraising space, a virtual race is a great start 
    • Due to COVID19, there are people at home looking for things to do. A virtual race can provide people with a community activity.
    • A virtual race has a simple, low barrier entry point – the virtual race can be as long as the participants decide, so that everyone from old to young can participate.
    • Due to social isolation, people are craving connection and community right now. A virtual race gives them an opportunity to do that through your charity
    • We are still allowed outside to exercise, and it is important for our physical and mental health. Your event can therefore provide motivation for people to keep active.

    Be sure to check out our 14 Virtual Event Fundraising Ideas for some other event ideas, if a virtual race isn’t the thing for you.

    Being virtual, everything is obviously online! So instead of organizing a physical event space, focus on the online channels and platforms you will use.

    Participants can complete the race or walk in their own time, and update their community through their digital channels  – so you want to be sure you’ve got all the resources in place to help them with not only their challenge but their fundraising goals.

    Peer to peer fundraising success really depends on having the right platform – and with a virtual event this is even more important.

    We suggest getting started with what platform you are going to use, and scoping out any work that needs to be done to help you build it. You want to try and choose a platform that is easy to set up and use, can integrate with your existing systems, and one that won’t require any additional code or development.

    Some of the essentials features you should include are:

    • Mobile-optimized and branded campaign site, equipped with fundraising metrics like a fundraising goal and a real-time progress bar
    • Easy peer-to-peer page setup, so your fundraisers are able to quickly create and share their page
    • The platform must be able to take online donations – through as many payment options as possible including credit card and mobile payments (aka Apple and Google Pay)
    • Easily collect registration fees in the peer-to-peer setup process- if you choose to collect one
    • Easy donor and fundraiser management to help you save time on admin tasks like reporting, receipting, data entry, and more.

    Once you have decided on and set up your platform, it’s now time to promote your event and get people to sign-up!

    Here are some of ideas and suggestions to help you plan your event:

    • Create a timeframe for the virtual race so that you can countdown to the start and finish. 
    • Come up with your concept: do you want everyone to challenge themselves to complete a certain number of hours or miles of activity, or do you want to set one length (ie. ask everyone do walk 20 miles over the course of a week).
    • Make it engaging. Consider different ways you can recognize and celebrate participants.
    • Come up with a hashtag and encourage each person to post while doing their walkathon or race. (ie: The Arizona Friends And Foster Children Foundation came up with the hashtag #DoTheVirtualWalk to create community and keep people engaged online.
    • Decide if you’re going to charge a fee for registration (ie: the Arizona Friends and Foster Children Foundation charged $35, and mailed everyone a t-shirt

    To recruit your virtual walkathon or virtual race participants, you’ll want to:

    Here are some of ideas and suggestions to help you promote your event:

    • Use social media to promote your event – post on your page, groups and existing networks
    • Use local media to promote the event, particularly if your donors are located within the one area
    • Create promotional videos, and tell stories that compel people to sign-up to support your cause
    • Link to the event from your website
    • Be sure to give yourself a few weeks before the virtual race starts to promote it and get your first round of participants.

    We sat down with Kimberly Searles to discuss how she pulled off her successful virtual walkathon on our Nonprofit Leader Panel: How To Raise More Through Virtual Events: Watch the webinar on-demand.

    Once your virtual race has started, it’s important to keep you community engaged. Not only do you want them to continue raising money, but you also want to provide them with encouragement to finish the challenge. Keeping them motivated is key! 

    Here’s some ideas to keep your community engaged:

    • Set up an email nurture campaign that delivers weekly content to your participants including motivational quotes, fundraising updates, how-to kits and/or work out tips
    • Create a Facebook group where you can share participants’ updates and fundraising goals. This is also a place where your community can connect and share their own images, tips etc
    • Share content such as indoor workout videos and running/race tips 
    • Share the impact of the fundraisers by telling stories of the beneficiaries that they will support
    • Encourage participants to share their race updates with their friends and families through their own social channels

    Obviously the main goal of your virtual race is to raise much-needed funds for your cause.

    Here are some tips for helping your participants raise more money for their virtual race:

    Often people feel that if they’re unable to donate large sums of money to their favorite organization that they wouldn’t really be making an impact.

    CauseVox helps donors and other participants focus less on the transaction and more about the story and impact through the CauseVox impact metric and customizable donation tiers.

    The N Street Village team appreciated that the software allowed them to add an increment to their fundraising page so donors could see that their donation went to X number of meals for women in the shelter. People are more likely to give when they can see how their gifts get your organization to its goal.

    “We heard a lot of feedback from new donors who came on as team members of friends that the impact meter was a big driver for them. They were able to see that their $4 donation made a real impact on the overall fundraiser,” MaKenzie noted.

    In fact, a survey from Charities Aid Foundation found that 68% of their respondents said that it was important to have evidence about how a charity is having an impact. Descriptive Tiers are a bite-sized way to provide that information.

    With descriptive donation tiers, you can show each donor how much each gift size really makes a difference:

    CauseVox is your race-day teammate. 

    CauseVox helps you raise more with less effort for your virtual walkathon or race by taking the complexity out of fundraising. We’ll help you:

    • Launch a branded campaign with no IT person required
    • Recruit more participants with easy, < 60 setup fundraising pages
    • Get more donors through smart donation forms
    • + more

    Learn more about running your virtual walkathon or virtual race on CauseVox.

    Book a 1-1 Demo with our team to chat about how CauseVox can help you raise more through your virtual fundraising event.

    Everyone’s asking: how do I make my in-person event virtual?

    We sat down to discuss just that on our Nonprofit Leader Panel: How To Raise More Through Virtual Events. Watch the webinar on-demand.

    Source: www.causevox.com


    Gaming Monitors

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    *Returns: The 30-day return period is calculated from invoice date. Exceptions to Dell’s standard return policy still apply, and certain products are not eligible for return at any time. Television returns are subject to restocking fees. See dell.com/returnpolicy.

    Offers subject to change, not combinable with all other offers. Taxes, shipping, and other fees apply. Free shipping offer valid in Continental U.S. (excludes Alaska and P.O. Box addresses). Offer not valid for Resellers. Dell reserves the right to cancel orders arising from pricing or other errors.

    *Rewards are issued to your online Dell Rewards Account (available via your Dell.com My Account) typically within 30 business days after your order’s ship date. Rewards expire in 90 days (except where prohibited by law). “Current rewards balance” amount may not reflect the most recent transactions. Check Dell.com My Account for your most up-to-date reward balance. Up to 6% rewards only on Dell Preferred Account purchases. Up to 3% rewards when you spend $800 in a 12-month period on all other purchases. Bose products only eligible for up to 3% rewards. Total rewards earned may not exceed $2,000 within a 3 month period. Outlet purchases do not qualify for rewards. Expedited Delivery not available on certain TVs, monitors, batteries and adapters, and is available in Continental (except Alaska) U.S. only. Other exceptions apply. Not valid for resellers and/or online auctions. Offers subject to change, not combinable with all other offers. See Dell.com/rewardsfaq

    ^DELL PREFERRED ACCOUNT (DPA): Offered to U.S. residents by WebBank, Member FDIC. Taxes and shipping are extra and vary. Payments equal greater of 3% of the New Balance or $20. Min Interest Charge is $2.00. Dell and the Dell logo are trademarks of Dell Inc.

    Source: www.dell.com


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